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Did Rothschild say this famous quote? If yes, what did he mean by it?

Did Rothschild say this famous quote? If yes, what did he mean by it?


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"Give me control of a nation's money and I care not who makes it's laws" - Mayer Amschel Bauer Rothschild

This prominent international banker is commonly quoted this. First, did he actually say it? Second, what was its context (when and where was he and what other things did he say shortly before or after this) if we know? Finally, seeing as how this is likely his most notable quote, did he ever reflect on it at a later time shedding some light on it?


The actual quote which is attributed to Mayer Amschel Rothschild is:

Permit me to issue and control the money of a nation, and I care not who makes its laws!

A number of sources (such as this one) claim that this statement was made in 1838 (which would have been a difficult feat as he would have been dead for 26 years by then). Wikiquote claims that there is no way to verify by whom, when or why it was made. It notes:

No primary source for this is known and the earliest attribution to him known is 1935 (Money Creators, Gertrude M. Coogan). Before that, "Let us control the money of a nation, and we care not who makes its laws" was said to be a "maxim" of the House of Rothschilds, or, even more vaguely, of the "money lenders of the Old World".

It is adapted from another well known quote:

Let me make the songs of a nation, and I care not who makes its laws.

This is in turn attributed to the Scot, Andrew Fletcher:

In An Account of a Conversation he made his well-known remark "I knew a very wise man so much of Sir Christopher's sentiment, that he believed if a man were permitted to make all the ballads, he need not care who should make the laws of a nation."


The saying is apocryphal and was originated by the populist author T. Cushing Daniel, a Washington-based lobbyist and lawyer, in his testimony before the U.S. Congress in 1911 in hearings on House Resolution 314 (whether financiers were restricting trade by domination of the money supply). This is what Daniel said:

William Pitt made this statement: "Let the American people go into their debt-funding schemes and banking systems, and from that hour their boasted independence will be a mere phantom." He realized the maxim that Rothschilds laid down as fundamental: "Let us control the money of a country and we care not who makes its laws."

It is true that the Rothschilds had "maxims" and these were published by London weeklies in the 1890s. All of these maxims were homey things like "Be sure you are right, then go forward." Cushing simply invented the imaginary "control the money" maxim for the purposes of his books and testimony.

The original Rothschilds were very religious, modest people. Its hard to imagine Nathan R. or his brothers as having said such an arrogant thing and it conflicts with what is known about his personality. Long after Nathan R. was dead, during the period 1890-1910, which was a period of anti-trust and anti-wealth agitation in the United States many writers made up all kinds of stories to portray the Rothschilds and other "barons" according to their stereotypes of rich, arrogant puppet masters. These stereotypes often did not resemble the actual people.

Concerning the phraseology and idea that Daniel expressed, this was not original to him, but, as you might imagine, was adapted from the works of others. In this case the phrase appears to have come from a short paper on the History of New York State published in 1892 by Welland Hendricks, a school principal. This is what Hendricks wrote:

Our Dutch forefathers who seemed to care little whether the flag of England or of Holland floated over the weak fort of New Amsterdam so long as their trade was uninterrupted have bequeathed their spirit to our keen-sighted non-voting business men of to-day, and all along the motto of our leading citizens has seemed to be - let us make the money of the nation and we care not who makes its laws.

Daniel completely perverted the original sense of the sentence to his own purpose. Hendricks was borrowing the phrase as well. In 1890, a meddlying clergyman named Wilbur Crafts, who tried to get all kinds of moralistic laws passed in New York, wrote a tract promoting the banning of work on Sunday containing the paragraph:

Massachusetts took upon herself the appointment of Boston's Police Commissioners, and so of her police. The lawless had been saying for years, "Let us appoint the city's police and we care not who makes its laws."

The actual origin of the printed phrase dates back to the 17th century Scottish Parliamentarian, Andrew Fletcher:

I said I knew a very wise man so much of Sir Christopher's sentiment, that he believed if a man were permitted to make all the ballads he need not care who should make the laws of a nation, and we find that most of the ancient legislators thought that they could not well reform the manners of any city without the help of a lyric, and sometimes of a dramatic poet.

-- An ACCOUNT of A CONVERSATION concerning A RIGHT REGULATION of GOVERNMENTS For the common Good of Mankind: In A LETTER to the Marquiss of Montrose , the Earls of Rothes, Roxburg and Haddington, From London the first of December, 1703'.

Now, of whom is Fletcher speaking? Who is the "very wise man"? It is, of course, Sir Phillip Sydney (1554-1586), the English poet who came to completely dominate the court of Queen Elizabeth even though he was only in his 20s. Sydney is the one who originated the phrase "Let me make the ballads of a nation, and I care not who makes its laws."


What he (probably) meant by it (who can say for sure now?) is that of all the possible means a government has to control and influence its people, the issueing of money is the most powerful one. Even more powerful than law.

By creating new money, the government can decrease the value of the existing money in circulation, thereby lowering the buying power of those holding it. In turn it can use the created money to buy assets on the free market. It's not fair competition.

This quote is often used in (political) statements against fiat money. They reason that by inflating the money supply, governments are actually stealing the wealth from their people without them (directly) noticing it. It is much easier to just create new money than to raise taxes. Tax revolts were quite common back in the old days, but inflation revolts? None would be the wiser until it was too late. "Read my lips, I will not raise taxes.". He says nothing about national debt, eh?

The United States, before they became independent of England, had issues with their (forced) use of the English pound, a currency which they did not control. The US constitution actually spends quite some words on trying to prevent US money from ever becoming fiat. Money should belong to the people was the founding fathers' opinion, and not to the head of state. Thomas Jefferson has even been quoted as saying that

I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies.

So there you have it. Money is more powerful and dangerous than both laws and standing armies.


Rothschild Conspiracy: Do They Rule The World?

The name Rothschild is literally associated with wealth. For over 200 years, the Rothschild family have remained the most powerful and wealthy family in the world. Their wealth has been made primarily in the world of banking. However, they have massive investments in other industries such as real estate, oil and construction. The Rothschilds are rumored to be one of the thirteen great families running the world, and the Rothschild conspiracy with regard to banking is one of the oldest in modern times.

“This multinational banking family is a byword for wealth, power – and discretion… The Rothschild name has become synonymous with money and power to a degree that perhaps no other family has ever matched”
– The Daily Telegraph, UK newspaper

This unique family began with their patriarch, Mayer Amschel Rothschild. He was a Jew living in Germany in the 18th century. He was a court Jew or personal banker of the German royals and governors of the Roman states in Hesse-Kassel. In the year 1760, he has begun a banking business in the city of Frankfurt. Over time, he provided his services to the nobles and royals of Germany and accumulated a huge fortune.

Amschel had five sons and he passed on his wealth to them. They include Nathan Mayer-Rothschild, Salomon-Mayer von Rothschild, James-Mayer de Rothschild, Carl-Mayer von Rothschild and Amschel Mayer Rothschild. These sons went on to establish banks in the European cities of Vienna in Austria, London in the United Kingdom, Naples in Italy, Frankfurt in Germany and Paris in France. Together, they coordinated the banking activities of all of Europe. They laid the foundations of banking and even innovated some of the processes of the banking sector for example high volume, confidentiality, diversification and fast communications. They also formed close relations with the ruling families in the countries where they went to establish banks.

For example, Carl Rothschild grew very close with the Italian noble family, the de’ Medici. Since then, the Rothschild family has amassed a family fortune estimated to be $500 trillion by some conspiracy outlets. However, the total wealth of the world was estimated to be at $250 trillion in 2015 according to Credit Suisse’s “Global Wealth Report”. However, they do own a large if unspecific sum of money and assets and are so powerful that they have a family coat of arms that is recognized internationally. In addition to that, Sir Evelyn de Rothschild is the personal financial adviser to the Queen of England. Some people say that this fortune was built using unscrupulous means. People believe in the Rothschild conspiracy theories due to their secrecy and also due to their immense fortune.


Benjamin Franklin's Famous Quotes

“There never was a good war or a bad peace.”
-Letter to Sir Joseph Banks, president of the Royal Society of London, July 1783. Also cited in a letter to Quincy, Sr., American merchant, planter and politician, September 1783.

“He that lies down with Dogs, shall rise up with fleas.”
- Poor Richard’s Almanack, 1733

“Better slip with foot than tongue.”
- Poor Richard’s Almanack, 1734

“Look before, or you’ll find yourself behind.”
- Poor Richard’s Almanack, 1735

“Don’t throw stones at your neighbors, if your own windows are glass.”
- Poor Richard’s Almanack, 1736

“He that would live in peace & at ease, Must not speak all he knows or judge all he sees.”
- Poor Richard’s Almanack, 1736

“Well done is better than well said.”
- Poor Richard’s Almanack, 1737

“A right Heart exceeds all.”
- Poor Richard’s Almanack, 1739

“What you seem to be, be really.”
- Poor Richard’s Almanack, 1744

“A true Friend is the best Possession.”
- Poor Richard’s Almanack, 1744

“No gains without pains.”
- Poor Richard’s Almanack, 1745

“Dost thou love life? Then do not squander Time for that’s the Stuff Life is made of.”
- Poor Richard’s Almanack, 1746

“Lost Time is never found again.”
- Poor Richard’s Almanack, 1747

“When you’re good to others, you’re best to yourself.”
- Poor Richard’s Almanack, 1748

“Pardoning the Bad, is injuring the Good.”
- Poor Richard’s Almanack, 1748

“Hide not your Talents, they for Use were made. What’s a Sun-Dial in the shade!”
- Poor Richard’s Almanack, 1750

“Glass, China, and Reputation, are easily crack’d, and never well mended.”
- Poor Richard’s Almanack, 1750

“What more valuable than Gold? Diamonds. Than Diamonds? Virtue.”
- Poor Richard’s Almanack, 1751

“Haste makes Waste.”
- Poor Richard’s Almanack, 1753

“Search others for their virtues, thy self for thy vices.”
- Poor Richard’s Almanack, 1738


'Who do you think you are? I am!': Remembering the hottest quote in bowling history

Those eight magical words were dropped by pro bowler Pete Weber on Feb. 26, 2012, in a fit of victorious rage after he'd won his fifth US Open title.

When you read that quote, it makes little sense. When you hear it out loud, it makes less sense, and it'll even cause a laughing fit. Technically, the quote has punctuation, but Weber says it like it doesn't. It's a lot funnier if you write the quote in all caps and without punctuation, like it's a tweet from a weird Twitter account.

"WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE I AM"

The first time I saw this video, I had little context for what happened -- I knew Weber won the championship match in a bowling tournament, that he had a lot of energy in him when he won, that he dropped a "goddamn it," that he flubbed a braggadocious, nonsensical victory quote and that I couldn't stop laughing the first time I heard "Who do you think you are? I am!" But it wasn't until I watched the whole event that there was actually more to love about this moment than I thought. By the grace of the Professional Bowlers Association and their YouTube channel, you can watch the whole thing, too:

This is what made me appreciate Pete Weber's finest moment even more:

1. It took place during the 69th U.S. Open tournament.

2. This was Pete Weber's chance to pass his late, great father's record.

Seven years before the event, Dick Weber -- a Hall of Famer, a PBA founding member and Pete's father -- passed away. Dick had four US Open championship titles in his career, the most any bowler has ever had until Pete tied his record in 2007. The 2012 tournament was Pete's chance to both pass his father's record and become the only bowler to hold five US Open championships. It puts Weber's win and famous quote in a different light, an aspect that got lost when the video first went viral.

3. Pete Weber entered the event as the lowest seed.

It's important to note this because the US Open has a "stepladder" format, meaning that the lowest seed has to defeat seeds No. 3 and 2 before getting to the championship match. So, the odds were pretty much stacked against Weber to begin with, although he handily beat Ryan Shafer in the first match. In the second match against Australian bowler Jason Belmonte, Weber got a crucial break when, in the 10th frame, Belmonte missed two pins in the final roll, giving Weber some leeway to win. The third match was even closer, with Weber barely beating Mike Fagan with one point on a final strike.

4. Pete Weber's theme music is Triple H's theme music.

It caught me off guard for a bit when I heard a WWE theme song during a bowling tournament. I didn't know if it was the PBA trying to mess with fans or if it was truly the song Weber wanted to play every time he scored a strike. And then I noticed something in the first few minutes of the show:

That's right, he crotch chops like he's part of D-Generation X. It turns out Weber is a huge wrestling fan, and his favorite wrestler is Triple H, and when you think about it, that fandom makes total sense. So much of Triple H's personality has rubbed off on Weber, and because of that, it makes for compelling television. Everyone else is prim and proper -- at least, as much as you can be in a bowling alley -- while Weber has seething intensity inside him, covered by sunglasses he's wearing indoors. You can't help but want to see what he'll say or do next when he's playing. His personality may be off-putting, but he's the reason why you'll keep watching bowling on television.

5. At one point, he starts getting chippy with an audience member.

It kind of makes sense why someone would get mad when they get distracted during a bowling match -- it takes patience and concentration, two qualities that I don't possess when I bowl. When it happened to Weber, it was incredibly uncomfortable and confusing, because no one had any idea who he was talking to. The first instance actually happened during the fourth frame in the first match, after Weber was struggling in the first two frames. He scored a strike, then looked to his left, visibly upset that someone distracted him:

From then on, it would be near-confrontational, with Weber continuously pointing at the person, asking the judges to move them if they kept distracting him and dropping hot lines like "It's called sportsmanship, pal."

Interestingly enough, this confrontation played a role in his famous line because .

6. "Who do you think you are? I am!" was actually directed to the distracting person.

In an interview with Storm Bowling, Weber revealed why he bragged in the first place and what caused him to flub:

"I guess what everybody wants to know is where did I come up with 'Who do you think you are? I am!' Well, being caught up in the moment of throwing the strike and being as excited as I was, I had a kid rooting against me during the match, and he was doing it just loud enough for me to hear. And it kind of made me mad, and people know . don't make me mad on TV, 'cause I'll just get better.

"But what I really wanted to say was 'Who do you think you are rooting against me? I'm the man of this tournament!' That's what I really wanted to say, but as everybody knows, it's 'Who do you think you are? I am!' . which, it caught on! It's a worldwide catchphrase now."

It usually takes one weird moment to overshadow everything else. We know this because we live on the Internet, and we treat every weird moment with a lot more scrutiny that it probably deserves. Yes, it was a flub, and a funny one at that. It's the one moment from the 2012 US Open everybody remembers the most, earning him the No. 1 spot in ESPN's "Not Top 10" list.

But when you take a step back, and watch everything that came before "Who do you think are? I am!" it doesn't feel like a blooper. It feels perfect. Pete Weber defeated three guys in one night with two close wins, with Triple H's music blaring with every strike, with a kid trying to ruin his night, on the nicest annual of the US Open, with the loving spirit of his late father blanketing him. He earned the right to brag, no matter how awkward it came out of his mouth.


Did Rothschild say this famous quote? If yes, what did he mean by it? - History

President Andrew Shepherd:
I want to buy her some flowers. That's what men do when they break a date.

Robin McCall:
That's not what men do. I know no men who do that.

[Looking through Andrew Shepherd's college transcript]

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Oh, Andy, a C minus in Women's Studies.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Yeah, well, that class wasn't about what I thought it was about.

[Ushering Sydney out of the White House after spending her first night there]

President Andrew Shepherd:
I'm sorry about this. We'll do it better next time.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Well, I'm no expert but I think we did it pretty good this time.

Lewis Rothschild:
Can I just state very clearly I can't be part of anything illegal.

A.J.:
Good for you, Lewis.

Lewis Rothschild:
Say what you want. It's always the guy in my job that ends up doing 18 months in Danbury minimum security prison.

Lewis Rothschild:
Who're we calling, sir?

President Andrew Shepherd:
I'm calling the Organization of the United Brotherhood of It's None of Your Damn Business, Lewis. I'll be with you in a second.

[ dancing at a state dinner]

Sydney Ellen Wade:
I don't know how you do it.

President Andrew Shepherd:
It's Arthur Murray. Six lessons.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
That's not what I mean. Two hundred pairs of eyes are focused on you with two questions on their minds - who's this girl, and why is the President dancing with her?

President Andrew Shepherd:
Well, first of all, the two hundred pairs of eyes aren't focused on me. They're focused on you. And the answers are Sydney Ellen Wade, and because she said yes.

President Andrew Shepherd:
You're attracted to me, but the idea of physical intimacy is uncomfortable because you only know me as the President. But it's not always going to be that way, and the reason I know that is there was a moment last night when you were with ME, not the President. And I know what a big step that was for you. So, Sydney, I'm in no rush. Here's my plan. We're going to slow down, and when you're comfortable, that's when it's going to happen.

[Sydney emerges from the bathroom wearing nothing but one of his shirts]

President Andrew Shepherd:
Perhaps I didn't properly explain the fundamentals of the slowdown plan.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
[feeling the bed] No, you explained it great.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Are you nervous?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
No.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Good. My nervousness exists on. several levels. Number one, and this is in no particular order, I haven't done this in a pretty long time. Number two, uh, any expectations that you might have, given the fact that I'm. you know.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
[approaching seductively] The most powerful man in the world?

President Andrew Shepherd:
Exactly, thank you. I think it's important you remember that's a political distinction that comes with the office. I mean, if, uh, Eisenhower were here instead of me, he'd be dead by now. and number three.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Andy.

[Right before their first kiss]

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Do you think this is a good idea?

President Andrew Shepherd:
Probably not.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Mr. President, you've got bigger problems than losing me. You just lost my vote.

A. J. MacInerney:
The President doesn't answer to you, Lewis!

Lewis Rothschild:
Oh, yes he does A.J. I'm a citizen, this is my President. And in this country it is not only permissible to question our leaders it's our responsibility!

President Andrew Shepherd:
For the last couple of months, Senator Rumson has suggested that being president of this country was, to a certain extent, about character, and although I have not been willing to engage in his attacks on me, I've been here three years and three days, and I can tell you without hesitation: Being President of this country is entirely about character. For the record: yes, I am a card-carrying member of the ACLU. But the more important question is why aren't you, Bob? Now, this is an organization whose sole purpose is to defend the Bill of Rights, so it naturally begs the question: Why would a senator, his party's most powerful spokesman and a candidate for President, choose to reject upholding the Constitution? If you can answer that question, folks, then you're smarter than I am, because I didn't understand it until a few hours ago. America isn't easy. America is advanced citizenship. You gotta want it bad, 'cause it's gonna put up a fight. It's gonna say "You want free speech? Let's see you acknowledge a man whose words make your blood boil, who's standing center stage and advocating at the top of his lungs that which you would spend a lifetime opposing at the top of yours. You want to claim this land as the land of the free? Then the symbol of your country can't just be a flag the symbol also has to be one of its citizens exercising his right to burn that flag in protest. Show me that, defend that, celebrate that in your classrooms. Then, you can stand up and sing about the "land of the free". I've known Bob Rumson for years, and I've been operating under the assumption that the reason Bob devotes so much time and energy to shouting at the rain was that he simply didn't get it. Well, I was wrong. Bob's problem isn't that he doesn't get it. Bob's problem is that he can't sell it! We have serious problems to solve, and we need serious people to solve them. And whatever your particular problem is, I promise you, Bob Rumson is not the least bit interested in solving it. He is interested in two things and two things only: making you afraid of it and telling you who's to blame for it. That, ladies and gentlemen, is how you win elections. You gather a group of middle-aged, middle-class, middle-income voters who remember with longing an easier time, and you talk to them about family and American values and character. And wave an old photo of the President's girlfriend and you scream about patriotism and you tell them, she's to blame for their lot in life, and you go on television and you call her a whore. Sydney Ellen Wade has done nothing to you, Bob. She has done nothing but put herself through school, represent the interests of public school teachers, and lobby for the safety of our natural resources. You want a character debate, Bob? You better stick with me, 'cause Sydney Ellen Wade is way out of your league. [pauses] I've loved two women in my life. I lost one to cancer, and I lost the other 'cause I was so busy keeping my job I forgot to do my job. Well, that ends right now. Tomorrow morning, the White House is sending a bill to Congress for its consideration. It's White House Resolution 455, an energy bill requiring a 20 percent reduction of the emission of fossil fuels over the next ten years. It is by far the most aggressive stride ever taken in the fight to reverse the effects of global warming. The other piece of legislation is the crime bill. As of today, it no longer exists. I'm throwing it out. I'm throwing it out writing a law that makes sense. You cannot address crime prevention without getting rid of assault weapons and handguns. I consider them a threat to national security, and I will go door to door if I have to, but I'm gonna convince Americans that I'm right, and I'm gonna get the guns. We've got serious problems, and we need serious people, and if you want to talk about character, Bob, you'd better come at me with more than a burning flag and a membership card. If you want to talk about character and American values, fine. Just tell me where and when, and I'll show up. This is a time for serious people, Bob, and your fifteen minutes are up. My name is Andrew Shepherd, and I *am* the President.

A. J. MacInerney:
Excuse me, sir, where are you going?

President Andrew Shepherd:
I'm going over to her house. I'm going to stand outside her door until she let's me in, and I'm not leaving 'til I get her back.

A. J. MacInerney:
How are you going to do that, sir?

President Andrew Shepherd:
Well, I haven't worked that out yet, but I'm sure groveling will be involved.

[Discussing a reprisal for an attack on US troops]

A. J. MacInerney:
Sir, it's immediate, it's decisive, it's low-risk, and it's a proportional response.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Someday someone's going to have to explain to me the virtue of a proportional response.

President Andrew Shepherd:
What I did tonight was not about political gain.

Leon Kodak:
Yes sir. But it can be, sir. What you did tonight was very Presidential.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Leon, somewhere in Libya right now, a janitor's working the night shift at Libyan Intelligence Headquarters. He's going about doing his job. because he has no idea, in about an hour he's going to die in a massive explosion. He's just going about his job, because he has no idea that about an hour ago I gave an order to have him killed. You've just seen me do the least Presidential thing I do.

Lewis Rothschild:
You have a deeper love of this country than any man I've ever known. And I want to know what it says to you that in the past seven weeks, 59% of Americans have begun to question your patriotism.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Look, if the people want to listen to-.

Lewis Rothschild:
They don't have a choice! Bob Rumson is the only one doing the talking! People want leadership, Mr. President, and in the absence of genuine leadership, they'll listen to anyone who steps up to the microphone. They want leadership. They're so thirsty for it they'll crawl through the desert toward a mirage, and when they discover there's no water, they'll drink the sand.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Lewis, we've had presidents who were beloved, who couldn't find a coherent sentence with two hands and a flashlight. People don't drink the sand because they're thirsty. They drink the sand because they don't know the difference.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
[to the President] This isn't about me. How can you keep quiet? How do you have patience for people who claim they love America, but clearly can't stand Americans?

Leon Kodak:
[cut to conversation in progress] You see, the country has mood swings.

Lewis Rothschild:
Mood swings? Nineteen post-graduate degrees in mathematics, and your best explanation for going from a 63 to a 46 percent approval rating in five weeks is mood swings?

Leon Kodak:
Well, I could explain it better, but I'd need charts, and graphs, and an easel.

[President Shepherd watches his opponent finish up a speech on CNN]

President Andrew Shepherd:
Oh, wait a minute here comes my favorite part.

Bob Rumson:
My name is Bob Rumson, and I'm running for President!

President Andrew Shepherd:
Sure glad he cleared that up, because that crowd was about to buy some Amway products!

President Andrew Shepherd:
Is the view pretty good from the cheap seats, A.J.?

A.J.:
I beg your pardon?

President Andrew Shepherd:
Because it occurs to me that in twenty five years I've never seen YOUR name on a ballot. Now why is that? Why are you always one step behind ME?

A.J.:
Because if I wasn't, you'd be the most popular history teacher at the University of Wisconsin!

President Andrew Shepherd:
F*** you!

Lucy:
If you were a dork you should say you're sorry. Girls like that.

[Sydney is unaware the President is listening]

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Your boss is the chief executive of fantasy land!

President Andrew Shepherd:
Well, let's take him out back and beat the shit out of him!

President Andrew Shepherd:
Did she say anything about me?

A. J. MacInerney:
Ms. Wade?

President Andrew Shepherd:
When she called?

A. J. MacInerney:
Did she say anything about you?

President Andrew Shepherd:
No. We had a nice couple of minutes together. She threatened me, I patronized her. We didn't have anything to eat, but I thought there was a connection.

A.J.:
You've said it yourself a million times. If there had been a TV in every living room sixty years ago, this country does not elect a man in a wheelchair.

President Andrew Shepherd:
This is NOT the business of the American people!

A.J.:
With all due respect, sir, the American people have a funny way of deciding on their own what is and what is not their business.

Robin McCall:
I think the important thing is not to make it look like we're panicking.

President Andrew Shepherd:
See, and I think the important thing is actually not to BE panicking.

A.J.:
Excuse me, Mr. President, I just got off the phone with the federal mediator in St. Louis. Management just walked away from the table the baggage handlers, pilots and flight attendants are all getting set to walk out in forty-eight hours.

President Andrew Shepherd:
You know, I studied under a Nobel Prize-winning economist, and you know what he taught me?

A.J.:
Never have an airline strike at Christmas?

President Andrew Shepherd:
The White House is the single greatest home court advantage in the modern world.

President Andrew Shepherd:
She didn't say anything about me?

A.J.:
No, but I could always pass her a note before study hall.

Robin McCall:
It's Christmas.

Lewis Rothschild:
It's Christmas?

Leon Kodak:
Yeah. You didn't get the memo?

Leo Solomon:
Politics is perception.

A.J. MacInerney:
If anyone needs me, I'll be in the Roosevelt Room, giving Lewis oxygen.

A. J. MacInerney:
Oh, you only fight the fights you can win? You fight the fights that need fighting!

President Andrew Shepherd:
She's questioning your loyalty.

Lewis Rothschild:
Hell, I question it all the time.

Lucy Shepherd:
Do you see it as part of your job to torture me?

President Andrew Shepherd:
No, just one of the perks.

A. J. MacInerney:
Oh, and Leon, don't be the nice, sweet guy from Brooklyn on this one. Do what the NRA does.

Leon Kodak:
What, scare the shit out of them?

A. J. MacInerney:
Exactly.

Leon Kodak:
I can do that.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
I regrouped. You have to give me that. I stood in the middle of the Oval Office and made it clear that he who doesn't take the GDC seriously does so at his peril.

Beth Wade:
And then you walked out the wrong door.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Are you going to keep throwing that back in my face for the rest of my life?

Beth Wade:
That's my current plan, yes.

Lewis Rothschild:
I tell any girl I'm going out with to assume that all plans are soft until she receives confirmation from me thirty minutes beforehand.

Robin McCall:
And they find this romantic?

Lewis Rothschild:
Well, I say it with a great deal of charm.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Lewis, however much coffee you drink in the morning, I want you to reduce it by half.

Lewis Rothschild:
I don't drink coffee, sir.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Then hit yourself over the head with a baseball bat, would you please?

A.J.:
Good night, Mr. President.

President Andrew Shepherd:
A.J.?

A.J.:
Yes, sir?

President Andrew Shepherd:
When we're out of the office, and alone, you can call me Andy.

A.J.:
I beg your pardon, sir?

President Andrew Shepherd:
You were the best man at my wedding, for crying out loud. Call me Andy.

A.J.:
Whatever you say, Mr. President.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Two-ball on the side. [He makes the shot, and the two-ball goes into the pocket]

A. J. MacInerney:
Nice shot, Mr. President.

President Andrew Shepherd:
"Nice shot, Mr. President"? You won't even call me by my name when we're playing pool?

A. J. MacInerney:
I will not do it playing pool, I will not do it in a school. I do not like green eggs and ham, I do not like them, Sam I Am.

President Andrew Shepherd:
At ease, A.J. At ease. [He prepares to hit the nine-ball into the corner pocket A.J. stands by that pocket] Would - would you get away from the pocket?

A. J. MacInerney:
I beg your pardon, sir.

A.J.:
Mr. President, this is an election year. If you're looking for female companionship, we can make certain arrangements that will ensure total privacy.

President Andrew Shepherd:
I don't want you to get me a girl, A.J.! What is this, Vegas?

A.J.:
No sir, this is the White House.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Hello?

President Andrew Shepherd:
Yeah, hi, is this Sydney?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Leo?

President Andrew Shepherd:
No, this is Andrew Shepherd.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Oh! It's Andrew Shepherd! Yeah, you're hilarious, Richard, you're just a regular riot!

President Andrew Shepherd:
No, this isn't Richard, this is Andrew Shepherd.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Oh! Well, I'm so glad you called, because I forgot to tell you today what a nice ass you have. I'm also impressed that you were able to get my phone number given the fact that I don't have a phone. Good night, Richard.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Uh, this isn't Richard- [Sydney hangs up] This used to be easier.

President Andrew Shepherd:
[Lucy is putting on his bow tie] That's a little tight, Luce.

Lucy Shepherd:
It's supposed to be tight. It's supposed to make you look regal.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Is it supposed to cut off the blood flow to my face?

[On the phone with the florist]

President Andrew Shepherd:
Perhaps it would be better if you bill me for the flowers, I'm sure it'll be all right with your boss. Well, I don't know if you recognize my voice, but this is the president. Of the United States. Hello?

Leo Solomon:
I hired your reputation, Sydney. I hired a pit bull, not a prom queen.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
That's unfair.

Leo Solomon:
It's *incredibly* unfair.

President Andrew Shepherd:
You have concerns?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Yes. Not many. A few. One. I have one concern.

President Andrew Shepherd:
This wouldn't have to do with the fact that one of us is president?

Lucy Shepherd:
My Dad told me to tell you that he's on the phone with his dentist, and that I should behave myself and entertain you until he gets back.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Oh. Your father's on the phone with his dentist?

Lucy Shepherd:
No, he told me to tell you he's on the phone with his dentist. He wants you to think he's a regular guy.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Oh. Well, who's he on the phone with?

Lucy Shepherd:
The prime minister of Israel.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Do you think there will ever be a time when you can stand in a room with me and not think of me as the President?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
This isn't a state of mind. You are the President. And when I'm in a room with you, oval or any other shape, I'm always gonna be a lobbyist, and you're always gonna be the President.

President Andrew Shepherd:
I have news for you, Sydney. As a lobbyist, you'd never be alone in a room with the President.

[Watching Bob Rumson on television]

Bob Rumson:
Last night, the cost of those liberal programs was raised to include the blood of 22 American soldiers. Now, Mr. Shepherd's read a lot of books, but it doesn't take a Harvard degree to see this one coming a mile down the road.

President Andrew Shepherd:
I went to Stanford, you blowhole!

President Andrew Shepherd:
How much do you make?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
More than you do, Mr. President.

President Andrew Shepherd:
The name is Andy. How much money do you make?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
What the hell does it matter how much money I make?

President Andrew Shepherd:
You raise your voice to the president?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Bob Rumson's gotta be drooling over this!

President Andrew Shepherd:
Are you attracted to me?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
I beg your pardon?

President Andrew Shepherd:
I asked if you were attracted to me.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
That's not the issue.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Well, I tell you what, let's make it the issue. Let's try something new, because I know that most couples when they first get together are inclined to slam on the brakes because they're concerned about Bob Rumson's drool.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Let me see if I got this. The third story on the news tonight was that someone I didn't know thirteen years ago when I wasn't president participated in a demonstration where no laws were being broken in protest of something that so many people were against, it doesn't exist anymore. Just out of curiosity, what was the fourth story?

[picking up the Oval Office phone]

President Andrew Shepherd:
Yeah, hi, good morning. how do I get an outside line? [hears dial tone immediately] Well, that was easy.

Leo's secretary:
Mr. Solomon? This was just delivered by a White House messenger. It's marked perishable.

Leo Solomon:
The White House has sent me something perishable?

Leo's secretary:
It's for Ms. Wade.

Leo Solomon:
Oh, here we go.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Relax, Leo, I'm sure it's just a formality.

Leo's secretary:
It's from him.

Leo Solomon:
Of course it's from him.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
So he had some staff flunky send me a fruit basket.

Leo's secretary:
Well, he wrote the note himself.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
I'm sure he didn't take the time to.

Leo's secretary:
The messenger said he waited in the Oval Office for ten minutes while the president wrote the card.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Okay, listen- it took him ten minutes to write the card?

Leo's secretary:
Apparently he went through several drafts.

David:
We should do some prep work. You wanna order in?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Uh, I can't. I'm having dinner at the White House. So let's start early tomorrow morning, say 7:30?

David:
Okay. I'm having lunch at the Kremlin, so we'll have to, you know, start even earlier than that.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Good night, David.

David:
In order for me to catch the morning plane to Moscow.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Good night, David!

President Andrew Shepherd:
You ever been to Camp David?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Camp David? Sure, I used to go there all the time, but then they changed chefs.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Seven trillion dollar communications system at my disposal, and I can't find out if the Packers won.

[Watching Rumson on television]

Bob Rumson:
I don't even know what we call her. Is she the First Mistress?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Oh, man. my father heard that.

President Andrew Shepherd:
If Mary hadn't died, would we have won three years ago?

A.J.:
Would we have won?

President Andrew Shepherd:
If we had to go through a character debate three years ago, would we have won?

A.J.:
I don't know. But I would have liked that campaign. If my friend Andy Shepherd had shown up, I would have liked that campaign very much.

[after President Shepherd's speech]

Leon Kodak:
Well, you don't see that every day of the week.

Lewis Rothschild:
He's got the whole White House press corps asking each other how to spell erudite!

A.J.:
Better call the printer, Lewis.

Lewis Rothschild:
I know, we gotta rewrite the State of the Union.

A.J.:
Every word, kid. It's a whole new ballgame. You have exactly 35 minutes.

Lewis Rothschild:
Oh, good, I thought I was gonna be rushed!

Sydney Ellen Wade:
How'd you finally do it?

President Andrew Shepherd:
Do what?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Manage to give a woman flowers and be president at the same time?

President Andrew Shepherd:
Well, it turns out I've got a rose garden.

President Andrew Shepherd:
She didn't say anything about me?

A. J. MacInerney:
Well, she did say you were taller than she thought you'd be.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Well, that's something.

President Andrew Shepherd:
For reasons passing understanding, people do not relate guns to gun-related crime.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
If someone had asked me yesterday, I'd have told them that the Quebec Conference is made up of six professional hockey teams.

Leo Solomon:
There's never an egg timer around when you need one.

Leo Solomon's Secretary:
Dig it, Miss Wade. you're the President's girlfriend!

Lewis Rothschild:
But we're not gonna stay at 41. The numbers are gonna go back up.

Lewis Rothschild:
But they're gonna go back up.

Lewis Rothschild:
All right George.

Lewis Rothschild:
Congressman.

Lewis Rothschild:
Congressman Jarrett.

Lewis Rothschild:
Look George, listen to me. it's crunch time. It's personal. This is one of those moments. It's just you and the President. Now what's it gonna be? Yeah.

Lewis Rothschild:
Yeah.

[shakes his head as he listens]

Lewis Rothschild:
All right George, can I tell you something? We're gonna win this thing. We're gonna get the votes we need and we're gonna win this thing. And you know what I'm gonna do after that, I mean that very night, I'm gonna go to Sam & Harry's, I'm gonna order a big steak, and I'm gonna make a list of everybody who tried to *f**** [slams pop can off his desk with a fist] us this week!

Robin McCall:
Lewis!

Lewis Rothschild:
[into phone] Well just Vote your conscience, you chicken-shit, lame-ass.

Lewis Rothschild:
[continuing to Robin and Leon] We lost Jarrett.

Leon Kodak:
[beat] I hope so. 'Cause, you know, if that was an "undecided," then we need to work on our people skills.

Janie:
The 10:15 event has been moved inside to the Indian Treaty Room.

President Andrew Shepherd:
10:15 is American Fisheries?

Janie:
Yes sir. They're giving you a 200-pound halibut.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Janie, make a note. We need to schedule more events where somebody gives me a really big fish.

Janie:
Yes sir. [starts making note]

President Andrew Shepherd:
Janie, I'm kidding.

Janie:
[Stops and starts to smile] Of course, sir.

President Andrew Shepherd:
It's sass, right? You're sassin' me.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
[with dread as she realizes that she was in fact speaking with the president on the phone] Mr. President. um. uh. I'm sure there's an appropriate thing to say at this moment. probably some formal apology for the "nice ass" remark would be in order, I just. I don't quite know how to word it.

President Andrew Shepherd:
No, it's my fault. I shouldn't have called you at home. Should I call you at the office tomorrow?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
No, no, of course not. I mean, yes, you can call me anytime you want. this is fine, right now is fine, when I said, "of course not," I meant. that. You know what, to hell with it, I'm moving to another country!

Lucy:
Just be yourself.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Be myself.

Lucy:
Yeah, and compliment her shoes. Girls like that.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
[as they head to the state dinner] Do you do this often?

President Andrew Shepherd:
Well, we had a state dinner for the prime minister of Japan, who died shortly thereafter, so we stopped having them just in case.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
No. I mean, do you date often?

President Andrew Shepherd:
Oh. No. You?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Yeah, well, lately I seem to be going out on a lot of first dates.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Oh, so you've got experience with this kind of thing.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Oh yeah, you can ask me anything.

President Andrew Shepherd:
So, how are we doing?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Ohhh you know pretty much everyday first date kind of stuff.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Darn, and I wanted to be different than the other guys.

[leaves her with her escort]

President Andrew Shepherd:
Oh, by the way, nice shoes.

Robin McCall:
Buenas Dias, Senior Presidente.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Too tall McCall, how was Mexico?

Robin McCall:
I didn't truly appreciate it until I came back and discovered that America isn't a great society?

Lewis Rothschild:
He dumped a whole section.

[Sydney and President D'Astier were conversing in French]

President Andrew Shepherd:
Sydney, you didn't dissolve our trade agreements, did you?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
No, I just said we're sitting in this beautiful room, listening to the music of this wonderful orchestra, and I wondered why nobody was dancing.

President Ren? Jean D'Astier:
And I informed Miss Wade that in my country, a guest at the palace of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette would soon find their head in a guillotine if they made the impertinent gesture of dancing without so much as a by-your-leave from the King and the Queen. [laughs]

A. J. MacInerney:
I bet no one accused Louis of being soft on crime.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
There's a lesson there, Mr. President.

President Andrew Shepherd:
More beheadings at the White House!

President Andrew Shepherd:
Do you know what your problem is?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
What's my problem?

President Andrew Shepherd:
Sex and nervousness.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Sex and nervousness is my problem?

President Andrew Shepherd:
Yes. Last night when we were looking at those place settings in the Dish Room, I realized those place settings were provided by the first ladies. And I'll bet none of those first ladies were nervous about having sex with their President husbands. And do you know why?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
No, but I'm sure you'll explain it to me.

President Andrew Shepherd:
I will. Because they weren't Presidents when they first met them. That's not the case here.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Why did I have to kiss him?

Beth Wade:
You kissed him? You didn't tell me that. Where did you kiss him?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
On the mouth.

Beth Wade:
Where in the White House?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
The dish room.

Beth Wade:
The dish room?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
The china room.

Beth Wade:
And then what happened?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
He had to go and attack Libya.

Beth Wade:
It's always something.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Yeah. I gotta nip this in the bud. This has catastrophe written all over it.

Beth Wade:
In what language? Sydney, the man is the leader of the free world. He's brilliant, funny, handsome. He's an above-average dancer. Isn't it possible our standards are just a tad high?

[after asking Sydney to join him for the state dinner. Long pause]

President Andrew Shepherd:
Sydney, Congress doesn't take this long.

President Andrew Shepherd:
[Lewis calls the President early in the morning] Lewis, it is five a.m. You have got to get yourself a life, man.

Lewis Rothschild:
[the President wants to get flowers for Sydney] At least let the agents do a security sweep. We don't know who's in there!

President Andrew Shepherd:
You think there's a florist in there planning an assassination on the the off-chance that I might be stopping by?

Lewis Rothschild:
It's possible.

A. J. MacInerney:
I feel a nightmare coming on.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Douglas, does the NRA have video tapes of you playing golf with Satan?

Susan Sloan:
I just want to go on record and apologize for my attitude towards you since your arrival.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Oh, I didn't notice. Was there an attitude?

Susan Sloan:
Well, I - I think that um, that I - I have a lot of pent-up hostility.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Well, I.

Susan Sloan:
You know, and I'm wondering who I should blame that on.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
I'm not really qualified to.

Susan Sloan:
You know, because I've been blaming it on my mother and my ex-husband and, well, that doesn't seem to be working.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Listen, I feel terrible about this, but I'm going to have to cancel our date tonight.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Another woman?

President Andrew Shepherd:
No, I've gotta go to St. Louis to avert a massive airline strike.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Boy, if I had a nickel for every time I've heard that one.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Janie, can you get me the number of a local florist?

Janie:
I'll take care of it, sir, where would you like them sent?

President Andrew Shepherd:
No, I want to do it myself. I just need the number.

Janie:
I don't understand

President Andrew Shepherd:
I want the phone number of a florist.

Janie:
You just want the phone number?

President Andrew Shepherd:
Yeah.

Janie:
I don't understand, sir, is there a problem.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Janie, I want to send some flowers. I want to do it myself. I don't want to staff it out, and I don't want to issue and executive order. I just want a phone number.

Robin McCall:
How do you want me to handle the "Sydney issue?"

President Andrew Shepherd:
The "Sydney issue?"

Lewis Rothschild:
We should have a consensus on how the White House is going to handle it.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Well I sure hope the "Sydney issue" refers in some way to a problem we're having with Australia, because if it's anything other than that.

Janie:
Mr. President? Ms. Wade is here to see you.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Send her in, please. I'm finished here.

Janie:
Yes, sir.

President Andrew Shepherd:
[to Lewis and McCall] There is no "Sydney issue."

Lewis Rothschild:
People want leadership, Mr. President, and in the absence of genuine leadership they'll listen to anyone who steps up to the microphone. They want leadership. They're so thirsty for it they'll crawl through the desert toward a mirage. When they discover there's no water there, they'll drink the sand.

President Andrew Shepherd:
[as Sydney is angrily leaving] Syd, please, I don't want to lose you over this.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Mr. President, you got bigger problems than losing me. You just lost my vote!

Bob Rumson:
[singing giddily that an aide has found a compromising photo of Sydney] It's beginning to look a lot like Christmas.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Sorry to keep you waiting.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Mister President.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Is it all right if I call you Sydney?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Of course, Mister President.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Have you ever been in the oval office?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Uh. I've just been on the regular tour. It didn't include.

President Andrew Shepherd:
I hear its pretty good.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Mister President, what you saw in there was nothing more than vanity run a muck. I was showing off for a colleague who doesn't think very much of me. It would be a real injustice for you to hold the GDC accountable for my behavior today. On top of which, I am monumentally sorry for having insulted you like that.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Are you under the impression I am mad at you?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Well, uh.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Sydney, seldom does a day go by where I am not burned in effigy.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Not by a professional political operative standing 30 feet from the oval office.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Nah, I'll grant you that.

President Andrew Shepherd:
Listen, are you hungry? I skipped breakfast. You wanna. have a doughnut? Coffee or something?

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Sir, I'm a little intimidated by my surroundings. And yes, I have gotten off to a rocky and somewhat stilted beginning, but don't let that diminish the weight of my message. The GDC has been at every president for the last decade and a half that global warming is a calamity the effects of which will be second only to nuclear war. The best scientists in the world have given you every reason to take the GDC seriously, but I'm going to give you one more. If you don't live up to the deal you just made, come New Hampshire we're going to go shopping for a new candidate. [turns to leave]

President Andrew Shepherd:
You can't do that, Sydney.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
[starts to open door to a side room] With all due respect, Mister President, who's going to stop me?

President Andrew Shepherd:
Well, if you go through that door, the United States Secret Service. That's my private office.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Ah.

President Andrew Shepherd:
You have to go out that door, [points to his right] over there. [Sydney closes the door to his private office, crosses the room, and leaves]

Sydney Ellen Wade:
[Referring to Lucy Shepherd] She's wonderful

President Andrew Shepherd:
She's her mother

Sydney Ellen Wade:
She's you

A.J.:
Listen, I'm going to have Janie clear your schedule for the weekend, you need to get some rest

President Andrew Shepherd:
Are you handling me A.J.?

A.J.:
No sir but I will if you don't start taking your head out your ass

President Andrew Shepherd:
Excuse me?

A.J.:
Lewis is right, go after this guy

President Andrew Shepherd:
Has Rumson lied in the past seven weeks?

A.J.:
Has he lied?

President Andrew Shepherd:
Other than not knowing the difference between Harvard and Stanford, has he said something that isn't true? Am I not a Commander in Chief who's never served in the military? Am I not opposed to a Constitution amendment banning flag burning? Am I not a unmarried father who shared a bed with a liberal lobbyist down the hall from his twelve year old daughter?

A.J.:
And you think you're wrong?

President Andrew Shepherd:
I don't think you win elections by telling fifty nine percent of voters that they are

President Andrew Shepherd:
Two hundred and sixty four million Americans.

Lewis Rothschild:
Two hundred and sixty four million Americans don't give a damn about your life, they give a damn about their own, Mr. President, you raised a daughter, almost entirely on your own, and she's terrific so what does it say to you in the past seven weeks, fifty nine percent of Americans question your family values

Robin McCall:
Never gone wrong parading you around as a lonely widower. I can't believe I said that, Mr. President that was an completely thoughtless remark. I would never dream of insulting you or the memory of your wife.

Sydney Ellen Wade:
Well then, congratulations. It's only taken you three years to put together crime prevention legislation that has no hope of preventing crime.


Theme 4: The Sadness of Life

There's wistful sadness in this particular Beckett play. The characters of Vladamir and Estragon are grim even in their casual conversation, even as Lucky entertains them with song and dance. Pozzo, in particular, makes speeches that reflect a sense of angst and sadness.

The tears of the world are a constant quantity. For each one who begins to weep somewhere else another stops. The same is true of the laugh. Let us not then speak ill of our generation, it is not any unhappier than its predecessors. Let us not speak well of it either. Let us not speak of it at all. It is true the population has increased.


11 Interesting Fahrenheit 451 Quotes & What They Mean

1. Quote: White blurs are houses. Brown blurs are cows. My uncle drove slowly on a highway once. He drove forty miles an hour and they jailed him for two days (9). Analysis: Clarisse tells Montag about her “strange” family, the one that actually converses with each other and enjoys nature. This shows just how shallow Montag’s society has become. Nobody thinks, one of many Bradbury predictions that have come true. For example, instead of taking the time to actually read this novel, you hopped online looking for some answers without taking the time to do your own analysis (Disregard that last part if, in fact, you read the novel and are just looking for a greater understanding of it (If you are looking for a greater understanding of it, we’ll be over later to burn your copy of the book)). 2. Quote: They had this machine. They had two machines really. One of them slid down into your stomach like a black cobra down an echoing well looking for all the old water and the old time gathered there (14). Analysis: Bradbury uses figurative language several times in the novel to give machines animal-like qualities. Here we have a simile, a stomach pump being compared to a snake. The snakes are here to revive Montag’s wife who has attempted suicide again. Suicides are popular in Montag’s society. 3. Quote: It’s really fun. It’ll be even more fun when we can afford to have the fourth wall installed. How long you figure before we save up and get the fourth wall torn out and a wall-TV put in. It’s only two thousand dollars (20). Analysis: I tried to help a friend put together a budget. He had massive credit card debt and no savings. I encouraged him to begin paying down his debt and create a savings program. He insisted it was impossible. We went over his expenses. He owned two giant TVs and paid nearly $150 dollars a month on cable. I suggested he cut his cable bill by $50 and start paying off one of his credit cards. He refused. He bought another TV for his bedroom. His wife lost her job and their home went into foreclosure. Now he has his three TVs in a one bedroom apartment. Bradbury was prophetic.

4. Quote: The mechanical hound slept but did not sleep, lived but did not live in its gently humming, gently vibrating, softly illuminated kennel back in a dark corner of the firehouse (24). 5. Quote: It doesn’t think anything we don’t want it to think (27). Analysis: Another animal-like machine, the mechanical hound is a metaphor for Montag and other members of his society. The mechanical hound is simply programmed to function as if it were a living being, but has no original thought or motives. In a similar way, Montag and other members of his society are technically alive, but they do not trully experience life because they have no original thoughts they only think what the TV tells him to think. Some claim this is another Bradbury prediction come true. I’m not sure. I have to check what Oprah says about it. 6. Quote: Don’t step on the toes of the dog lovers, the cat lovers, doctors, lawyers, merchant, chiefs, Mormons, Baptists, Unitarians, second-generation Chinese, Swedes, Italians, Germans, Texans, Brooklynites, Irishmen, people from Oregon or Mexico The bigger your market, Montag, the less you handle controversy (57). Analysis: Beatty explains the origins of banned books. This, however, is more of an authorial intrusion. I would say Bradbury’s prediction has come true in the form of political correctness and the influence of special interest groups in Congress, but I don’t want to offend anybody. In fact, I’ll choose to be offended since I qualify for three of the above groups. 7. Quote: Montag: I’ve got an awful feeling I want to smash things and kill things. Mildred: Go take the beetle (64). Analysis: Although everyone may feel like smashing things once in a while, this quote demonstrates the brutality and violence that is common in this society. Mildred suggests the beetle because while driving it one sometimes runs over rabbits and other creatures. 8. Quote: The train radio vomited upon Montag (79). Analysis: Great personification. If you don’t think this prediction has come true, turn on your car radio on your way to school or work and count how many morning DJs tell fart jokes.

9. Quote: But who has ever torn himself from the claw that encloses you when you drop a seed in a TV parlor? It grows you any shape it wishes! (84). 10. Quote: I plunk the children in school nine days out of ten. I put up with them when they come home three days a month it’s not bad at all. You heave them into the ‘parlor’ and turn the switch. It’s like washing clothes: stuff laundry in and slam the lid…They’d just as soon kick as kiss me. Thank God, I can kick back! (96). Analysis: Bradbury predicts a future where TV influences and shapes individuals. I wonder what Barney would say about that? Or Keith Olberman? Or Sean Hannity? Or Dr. Phil? I’m glad we don’t live in a world where TV is used as a baby sitter and families no longer speak to each other. That Ray Bradbury sure is crazy. The second quote contains a great simile comparing raising children to a chore, devoid of love or feeling. 11. Quote: “Go home.” Montag fixed his eyes upon her, quietly. “Go home and think of your first husband divorced and your second husband killed in a jet and your third husband blowing his brains out, go home and think of the dozen abortions you’ve had, go home and think of that and your damn Caesarian sections, too, and your children who hate your guts! Go home and think how it all happened and what did you ever do to stop it? Go home, go home!” he yelled. “Before I knock you down and kick you out the door.” (101). Analysis: Nothing ends a fine night of socializing faster than the “go home and think of your dead husband and your dozen abortions” blast. I wouldn’t recommend this line at your next dinner party. What do you think of Bradbury’s eerie prophecies? This could be the subject of a great paper!

Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451. New York: Ballentine Books. 1978.


Who Owned Slaves?

“Many Northern civilians owned slaves. Prior to, during and even after the War of Northern Aggression.”

“Mommy, he did it too!” is rarely a cogent or convincing form of historical argument, especially when — as in this case — one is referring to actions that were very different in degree and time.

It is true that slavery was not unique to the South: Both during the colonial era and after independence, slavery existed in areas that now comprise what we consider “Northern” states. But the suggestion that “many Northern civilians” owned slaves at the time of the Civil War is flat out wrong. All of the Northern states, with a single arguable exception, had (by law or by practice) ended slavery within their borders long before the Civil War began.

Where did legalized slavery still exist in the North in 1861? Only in Delaware, a state which was far from being undeniably a “Northern” state: depending upon the criteria used, one could justifiably have pegged Delaware at the time of the Civil War as being Northern, Southern, Mid-Atlantic, or some combination thereof. Either way, even though legislative efforts to abolish slavery in Delaware had been unsuccessful, by the time of the 1860 census 91.7% of Delaware’s black population was free, and fewer than 1,800 slaves remained in the state — hardly a condition supportive of the notion that “many” Northerners owned slaves.

Although Missouri, Kentucky, and Maryland never formally seceded from the Union, they were not “Northern” states in either a geographic or a cultural sense. All were home to substantial pro-Confederate elements and contributed significant numbers of troops to the Confederate side during the Civil War. Kentucky and Missouri were both claimed as member states by the Confederacy and were represented in the Confederate Congress, and Maryland remained in the Union primarily because U.S. troops quickly imposed martial law and garrisoned the state to head off secession efforts. (Maryland had to be kept in the Union by any means necessary, else the United States capital in the District of Columbia would have been completely enclosed within Confederate territory.) The state of New Jersey was something of an outlier. Although the New Jersey legislature passed a gradual emancipation measure in 1804 and permanently abolished slavery in 1846, the state allowed some former slaves to be reclassified as “apprentices for life” — a condition that could be considered slavery in all but name. Nonetheless, the 1860 census recorded only 18 slaves in all of New Jersey.


11 Famous 'Braveheart' Quotes

Mel Gibson&aposs Braveheart, the story of Scottish freedom fighter William Wallace who led a war against England during the 13th century, was epic for so many reasons. For instance, there were the impressive "before-CG" battle scenes, in which up to 1,600 extras fought to the (faux) death. Then there was the film&aposs romantic, tear-jerking soundtrack, and of course, Mel Gibson in a kilt.

But alas, the most touching and inspiring element of the film were the endless quotes about freedom, dying and more freedom. Here are some of our favorites: 

Mel Gibson on the set of his movie Braveheart.

Photo: Sunset Boulevard/Corbis/Getty Images

Young William: I can fight.
Malcolm Wallace: I know. I know you can fight. But it&aposs our wits that make us men.

William Wallace: Aye, fight and you may die. Run, and you&aposll live. at least a while. And dying in your beds, many years from now, would you be willin&apos to trade ALL the days, from this day to that, for one chance, just one chance, to come back here and tell our enemies that they may take our lives, but they&aposll never take. OUR FREEDOM!

William Wallace: We all end up dead, it&aposs just a question of how and why.

Magistrate: The prisoner wishes to say a word.
William Wallace: Freeeedommm!

William Wallace: There&aposs a difference between us. You think the people of this country exist to provide you with position. I think your position exists to provide those people with freedom. And I go to make sure that they have it.

Malcolm Wallace: Your heart is free. Have the courage to follow it.

Robert&aposs Father: At last, you know what it means to hate. Now you&aposre ready to be a king.
Robert the Bruce: My hate will die with you.

Queen Isabella: You see? Death comes to us all. But before it comes to you, know this: your blood dies with you. A child who is not of your line grows in my belly. Your son will not sit long on the throne. I swear it.

William Wallace: Before we let you leave, your commander must cross that field, present himself before this army, put his head between his legs, and kiss his own arse.

William Wallace: Lower your flags and march straight back to England, stopping at every home you pass by to beg forgiveness for a hundred years of theft, rape, and murder. Do that and your men shall live. Do it not, and every one of you will die today.

William Wallace: Every man dies, not every man truly lives.


Comedians, Writers, and Philosophers

Some people believe you can't be happy without money, some think you can't be happy with it. But it's a ripe source of material for anyone with a sense of humor or a sense of irony.

George Bernard Shaw: "The more I see of the moneyed classes, the more I understand the guillotine."

Henny Youngman: "What's the use of happiness? It can't buy you money."

Oscar Wilde: "When I was young I used to think that money was the most important thing in life. Now that I am old, I know it is."

Dorothy Parker: "Money cannot buy health, but I'd settle for a diamond-studded wheelchair."

Ralph Waldo Emerson: "Can anybody remember when the times were not hard and money not scarce?"

Cicero: "Endless money forms the sinews of war."

Groucho Marx: "It frees you from doing things you dislike. Since I dislike doing nearly everything, money is handy."



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