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Sonja Henie

Sonja Henie


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Sonja Henie was born in Oslo, Norway, on 8th April, 1912. Henie began ice-skating at the age of six and four years later was the Norwegian national figure-skating champion.

In 1927 she won the world amateur championship for women, holding the title for ten consecutive years. Henie was European Womans Ice Skating Champion (1931-1936) and won the Olympic gold medal for figure skating in 1928 (Germany), 1932 (United States) and 1936 (Switzerland).

Henie turned professional in 1936 and starred in touring ice-shows before going to Hollywood where she made several films including Thin Ice (1937), Happy Landing (1938), My Lucky Star (1938), Everything Happens at Night (1939), Iceland (1942) and The Countess of Monte Cristo (1948).

Henie and her third husband, the Norwegian shipowner Niels Onstad, the Henie Onstad Art Center, near Oslo. Sonja Henie died of leukemia on 12th October, 1969.


Henie, Sonja (1912–1969)

Norwegian figure skater who won three consecutive gold medals and became a movie box-office attraction surpassed in her day only by Shirley Temple and Clark Gable. Name variations: Sonia Henje. Born in Oslo, Norway, on April 8, 1912 (some sources erroneously cite 1910) died of leukemia on board an ambulance plane traveling from Paris to Oslo on October 12, 1969 daughter of Selma (Nilsen) Henie and Wilhelm Henie (a fur merchant and former champion cyclist) married Dan Topping, in 1940 married Winthrop Gardner, in 1949 married Niels On-stad, in 1956.

In addition to three Olympic gold medals (1928, 1932 and 1936), won ten consecutive World titles(1927–36) and six European championships (1931–36) starred in films (1927–58) along with Niels On-stad, acquired a superb art collection, the major part of which was donated to Norway where it found a home in a new art museum the Ostads erected outside Oslo (1968).


1948: Barbara Ann Scott's Classic Skating Skirt

During World War Two and the 1940s, there was a fabric shortage, so skating dress hemlines became shorter and shorter. A short classic skating skirt became the norm. Barbara Ann Scott, the 1948 Women's Olympic Figure Skating Champion, did a stag jump, her signature jump, that showed off that classic skating skirt.


World War II Controversy

Sonja Henie was closely involved with Adolf Hitler and other senior Nazi officials, which caused a lot of controversies right through the World War II period.

Due to her status as a wealthy celebrity, she moved in the same social circles as the likes of Hitler, and she met him on more than one occasion. She also met others such as the Crown prince of Norway and his wife, and Princess Margaret from the UK.

She was seen to greet Hitler with a Nazi salute during the Olympic Games, and she accepted a lunch invitation from him. The Norwegian press strongly condemned her for doing this.

Sonja Henie was very fortunate though, when the Nazi&rsquos occupied Norway, because she had an autographed photo of Hitler displayed where everyone could see it, and the result was that none of her properties were damaged or taken away by the Germans.


Villa Royale Inn Reflects Palm Springs History, Ambiance

VIDEO: Take a tour of some of the unique rooms at Villa Royale in Palm Springs.

Villa Royale Inn, located in the heart of South Palm Springs, embodies the history and ambiance of the desert.

What began as film star and Olympic figure skater Sonja Henie&rsquos estate in the 1940s has been preserved and developed into a hidden gem where celebrities, Palm Springs residents, and visitors alike have found a private getaway to relax in the warm desert weather.

&ldquoThere is no place in Palm Springs quite like Villa Royale Inn,&rdquo says hotel owner David Shahriari. &ldquoEach room has its own unique flair and the property as a whole remains true to the original feel that was present in the 1940s.&rdquo

With 31 uniquely appointed rooms, each villa offers distinctive antiques and decorations ranging from authentic China Plates to handmade furniture. The majority of the pieces integrated throughout the rooms from the Henie era include lamps, tables, and Asian-influenced artifacts.

One of the most popular villa living rooms was originally Henie&rsquos home. It features red and gold trimmed décor and several Asian influenced works of art.

Another popular room is adorned in light pastel colors and boasts &ldquoknight&rsquos chairs&rdquo that at one time were used by the English palace.

Villa Royale Inn, 1620 S. Indian Trail, Palm Springs, 1-800-245-2314
www.villaroyale.com

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Sonja Henie - History

In the history of cinema, there was only one Sonja Henie. After an amateur career in which she won three Olympic gold medals and ten consecutive World Figure Skating Championships, Henie embarked on a film career that saw her almost immediately become one of the highest-paid actresses of her time. Despite having little talent for acting or singing, Henie&rsquos artistry on the ice helped her musical comedies become some of the top box-office draws of the late 1930&rsquos and early 1940&rsquos.

Yet just as important to her success was a determination that is glimpsed in this biopic&rsquos opening scenes. While lacing up her skates before taking to the ice, the young Henie recites a few of her favourite things &ndash &ldquoSkates. Mum. Dad. Leif. Winning&rdquo. Initially such audaciousness is endearing, particularly when Henie out-negotiates 20th Century Fox head Darryl F. Zanuck to secure a four picture deal. Yet as her favourite things leave her in one fashion or another, Henie&rsquos brashness increasingly takes on a darker tone.

Wild scenes of Hollywood parties and drug-fuelled orgies are accompanied by a soundtrack that would not seem out of place in a Baz Lurhmann extravaganza. Yet the startling contrast between Henie&rsquos cherubic on-screen persona and her hedonistic off-screen behaviour are undone by the casting of the lithe lead. Nevertheless, Ine Marie Wilman impresses as the Nordic nymph, even managing to elicit sympathy for a character who ostensibly remains an Ice Queen on and off the rink.

Though the biopic glides over Henie&rsquos life pre and post-America, and rather perfunctorily deals with her disastrous 1952 tour, it does afford itself time to linger on moments that delve beneath her cold exterior. Early scenes of the close knit bond shared with family members hint at an undercurrent of competitiveness that leaves no-one unscarred when they boil to the surface. Regrettably, the film&rsquos rushed coda bears little relation to all that comes before it.


Sonja Henie Norwegian Skating

Sonja Henie was previously married to Niels Onstad (1956 - 1969) , Winthrop Gardner (1949 - 1956) and Daniel Topping (1940 - 1946) .

Sonja Henie had encounters with Greg Bautzer (1947) , Van Johnson (1945) , Cary Grant (1939) , Cesar Romero (1937) and John F. Kennedy.

About

Norwegian Skater Sonja Henie was born on 8th April, 1912 in Kristiania (now Oslo), Norway and passed away on 12th Oct 1969 Oslo, Norway (during a flight from Paris to Oslo) aged 57. She is most remembered for Olympic Champion (1928, 1932, 1936) in Ladies' Singles, a ten-time World Champion (1927�) and a six-time European Champion (1931�). Her zodiac sign is Aries.

Sonja Henie is a member of the following lists: American film actors, 1912 births and Deaths from leukemia.

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Relationship Statistics

TypeTotalLongestAverageShortest
Dating13 2 years 2 months, 12 days 2 months, 1 day
Married3 14 years, 9 months 10 years 7 years, 1 month
Encounter5 - - -
Total21 14 years, 9 months 1 year, 6 months 2 months, 1 day

Details

First Name Sonja
Last Name Henie
Full Name at Birth Sonja Henie
Alternative Name `Pavlova of the Ice`, Queen of the Ice
Age 57 (age at death) years
Birthday 8th April, 1912
Birthplace Kristiania (now Oslo), Norway
Died 12th October, 1969
Place of Death Oslo, Norway (during a flight from Paris to Oslo)
Cause of Death Cancer- Leukemia
Buried Henie Onstad Kunstsenter Grounds, Sandvika, Bærum kommune, Akershus fylke, Norway
Height 5' 1" (155 cm)
Build Slim
Eye Color Brown - Light
Hair Color Blonde
Zodiac Sign Aries
Sexuality Straight
Ethnicity White
Nationality Norwegian
High School Private tutors
Occupation Text Figure Skater, Actress, Tennis Player, Author
Occupation Skating
Claim to Fame Olympic Champion (1928, 1932, 1936) in Ladies' Singles, a ten-time World Champion (1927�) and a six-time European Champion (1931�)
Official Websites www.findagrave.com/memorial/6005, www.nndb.com/people/884/000031791/
Father Wilhelm Henie (furrier, cyclist) (1872–1937)
Mother Selma Lochmann-Nielsen (1888�)
Brother Leif
Associated People Jack Dunn (skating partner), Stewart Reburn (skating partner)

Sonja Henie (8 April 1912 – 12 October 1969) was a Norwegian figure skater and film star. She was a three-time Olympic champion (1928, 1932, 1936) in women's singles, a ten-time World champion (1927–1936) and a six-time European champion (1931–1936). Henie has won more Olympic and World titles than any other ladies' figure skater. At the height of her acting career, she was one of the highest-paid stars in Hollywood and starred in a series of box-office hits, including Thin Ice (1937), Happy Landing, My Lucky Star (1938), Second Fiddle (1939) and Sun Valley Serenade (1941).


Sonja Henie: A Singular Star

Sonja Henie in Thin Ice (1937)

Imagine this: after winning gold at the Olympics, an athlete like Michael Phelps or Chloe Kim goes to Hollywood, films a movie for six weeks, and then a few months later that movie is released and they become one of the biggest stars in the world. Seems crazy, right? However, this is precisely what happened to Norwegian figure skater Sonja Henie. In Hollywood’s history, there have been plenty of athletes-turned-actors, but few rose to such dazzling heights as ice queen Henie, a woman who carved out her own unique genre and became one of the wealthiest people in the world.

Henie’s determination and talent knew no bounds. She entered her first Olympics in 1924 at the incredible age of 11. When she was 14, she won her first of ten consecutive World Figure Skating Championships (a record that still stands) and she would soon rack up six European championships in a row. What may be most impressive about Henie’s competitive career is that she won the gold medal three consecutive times at the 1928, 1932, and 1936 Olympic Games, a record for ladies’ single skaters that still hasn’t been matched. As if that wasn’t enough, she is also credited with introducing short skirts and white skates to the sport, as well as the ballet and dance influences you see nowadays in the style and choreography of skaters. Sports Illustrated once wrote that Henie’s glamour and innovation transformed her sport and helped legitimize its place at the Olympics. You can see footage of Henie performing at the 1932 games here and after the 1928 games here.

After the 1936 Olympics, 24-year-old Henie made a bold move. She retired from competitions at the top of her game and took her skates to Hollywood, telling The New York Times “I want to do with skates what Fred Astaire is doing with dancing.” Her expectations were simple: $75,000 per film ($1.3 million in 2018 money!) and the films must be built around her (no supporting roles or specialty numbers for this gal!). All of the studios balked and Henie swiftly proved that she was worth it by staging a live ice show that brought in $28,000 in just a few nights.

As you can guess, the studios changed their tune and Henie struck an amazing deal with 20th Century Fox. For her first film, One in a Million, she was paid $60,000 she then signed a five-year contract that gave her $125,000 per film, which is $2.2 million in today’s money. As part of her contract, Henie would only film in the summer, allowing her to work in her live ice show in the winter.

Those ice shows, by the way, were Henie’s brilliant way of staying in the public eye and keeping audiences interested in her movies. Funnily enough, she had to convince promoters to take a chance on her much like she had to with the movie studios. When her price of $10,000 per night was refused by promoters, she rented a rink in Pennsylvania for three nights and demonstrated that she could bring in people.

Henie’s time in Hollywood was brief, lasting only twelve films, her last being 1948’s The Countess of Monte Cristo. During those twelve years, the skater had several lucrative endorsement contracts, with deals to market all sorts of merchandise with her name on it, including skates, jewelry, and dolls. Pretty soon, Henie found herself ridiculously wealthy. Her success was so incredible that it encouraged other studios to try and duplicate the formula. (This is most evident in the stunning career of MGM’s “Million Dollar Mermaid” Esther Williams. You can read more about Williams in this piece I wrote last year.)

Although Henie influenced figure skating immensely, contemporary audiences might be surprised by how much her skating differs from what you’d see pros like Kristi Yamaguchi, Michelle Kwan, or Dorothy Hamill doing. Henie’s routines don’t consist of complicated combinations, dramatic hand and arm gestures, or elongated glides. Rather than do triple Salchows and toe loops, she sticks with running across the ice on her toes, quick leaps, and absurdly fast spins that abruptly end with pretty poses. It is fascinating to watch, partly because we’ll never see skating like this again.

With her dimpled cheeks, curly blonde hair, and adorable Norwegian accent, Henie’s cinematic persona was one of sweetness and innocence. Her characters were good, honest girls whose skating talent earned them admiration, romantic love, and professional success amidst sleek Art Deco sets. As time went on, Henie tried to prove her acting mettle by starring in slightly more dramatic fare — Everything Happens at Night (1939) and It’s a Pleasure (1945), her only color film — but the skater was at her best when romancing leading men like Tyrone Power and performing on the ice in captivating routines that could sometimes veer into the bizarre, such as this routine from Wintertime (1943). She even demonstrated her lovely dancing skills in scenes like this one with Cesar Romero, which is also from Wintertime.

My favorite film of Henie’s is without a doubt 1941’s Sun Valley Serenade. It combines so many of the things that I love: Henie’s skating, John Payne’s singing, The Nicholas Brothers’ dancing, a charmingly daffy plot, and a tremendous score provided by Glenn Miller and His Orchestra. That score, by the way, includes the songs of Miller’s that I cherish the most: “Chattanooga Choo Choo,” “Moonlight Serenade,” and “In the Mood.” Sun Valley Serenade is also where the song “At Last” originated from. Written by Mack Gordon and Harry Warren specifically for the film, it was actually cut from the final product and saved for Glenn Miller’s second and final movie, Orchestra Wives, but thankfully you can still hear instrumental pieces of the tune in a nightclub scene and in Henie’s spectacular skating finale.

Throughout her life, Henie was a bit of a controversial figure due to her misguided actions before and during WWII. After her popularity in Hollywood dwindled, Henie continued to tour with her live shows, which experienced many ups and downs. In the 1950s, she attempted to get back in the movies with a series of travelogues, but only one entry titled Hello, London was made. Meanwhile, Henie and her third husband, Norwegian shipping magnate Niels Onstad, used their wealth to amass a huge art collection, which became the Henie-Onstad Art Centre in Norway. In 1969, Henie would die from leukemia at the age of 57.

Henie’s films are wholly hers — she is the center of attention she is the reason why these movies exist. It is easy to scoff at these fluffy confections, but there are few movies today that can replicate the effortless, easygoing charm that these films and their star exuded. I also have to applaud Henie’s confidence in herself and her abilities. She knew what she wanted and she fought for it, regardless of what others said. She created her own unique place in Olympic history, figure skating history, and, improbably, film history, all before the age of 25. I couldn’t appreciate this woman’s originality and fearlessness any more if I tried.


Love Letters to Old Hollywood

Imagine this: after winning gold at the Olympics, an athlete like Michael Phelps or Chloe Kim goes to Hollywood, films a movie for six weeks, and then a few months later that movie is released and they become one of the biggest stars in the world. Seems crazy, right? However, this is precisely what happened to Norwegian figure skater Sonja Henie. In Hollywood's history, there have been plenty of athletes-turned-actors, but few rose to such dazzling heights as ice queen Henie, a woman who carved out her own unique genre and became one of the wealthiest people in the world.

Henie's determination and talent knew no bounds. She entered her first Olympics in 1924 at the incredible age of 11. When she was 14, she won her first of ten consecutive World Figure Skating Championships (a record that still stands) and she would soon rack up six European championships in a row. What may be most impressive about Henie's competitive career is that she won the gold medal three consecutive times at the 1928, 1932, and 1936 Olympic Games, a record for ladies' single skaters that still hasn't been matched. As if that wasn't enough, she is also credited with introducing short skirts and white skates to the sport, as well as the ballet and dance influences you see nowadays in the style and choreography of skaters. Sports Illustrated once wrote that Henie's glamour and innovation transformed her sport and helped legitimize its place at the Olympics. You can see footage of Henie performing at the 1932 games here and after the 1928 games here.

After the 1936 Olympics, 24-year-old Henie made a bold move. She retired from competitions at the top of her game and took her skates to Hollywood, telling The New York Times, "I want to do with skates what Fred Astaire is doing with dancing." Her expectations were simple: $75,000 per film ($1.3 million in 2018 money!) and the films must be built around her (no supporting roles or specialty numbers for this gal!). All of the studios balked and Henie swiftly proved that she was worth it by staging a live ice show that brought in $28,000 in just a few nights.

As you can guess, the studios changed their tune and Henie struck an amazing deal with 20th Century Fox. For her first film, One in a Million, she was paid $60,000 she then signed a five-year contract that gave her $125,000 per film, which is $2.2 million in today's money. As part of her contract, Henie would only film in the summer, allowing her to work in her live ice show in the winter.

Those ice shows, by the way, were Henie's brilliant way of staying in the public eye and keeping audiences interested in her movies. Funnily enough, she had to convince promoters to take a chance on her much like she had to with the movie studios. When her price of $10,000 per night was refused by promoters, she rented a rink in Pennsylvania for three nights and demonstrated that she could bring in people.

Henie's time in Hollywood was brief, lasting only twelve films, her last being 1948's The Countess of Monte Cristo. During those twelve years, the skater had several lucrative endorsement contracts, with deals to market all sorts of merchandise with her name on it, including skates, jewelry, and dolls. Pretty soon, Henie found herself ridiculously wealthy. Her success was so incredible that it encouraged other studios to try and duplicate the formula. This is most evident in the stunning career of MGM’s "Million Dollar Mermaid" Esther Williams.

Actually, it was because of my Esther Williams obsession that I came to know about Henie. It took a few years for me to finally see her work, but when I did, I couldn't have picked a better introduction: 1941's Sun Valley Serenade. After recording the film from TCM and then just a few days later reading a fantastic review of it over at Silver Screenings, I felt like the universe was not-so-subtly nudging me towards watching this movie. Within the first two minutes, I was in love, and after a second viewing, I realized that it was going to be one of my favorite movies ever.

The story is fairly simple. Phil Corey (Glenn Miller) and his orchestra are stunned when they discover that the war orphan their pianist Ted (John Payne) adopted as a publicity stunt turns out to be the beautiful Norwegian Karen (Henie). Grateful for Ted's sponsorship, Karen quickly falls for him and wants to get married, but Ted is enamored with their band's vocalist, Vivian (Lynn Bari). When the band goes to Sun Valley, Idaho for a lucrative engagement, Ted tries to leave Karen behind in New York, but she convinces their publicist "Nifty" (Milton Berle) to sneak her on the train. Once in Sun Valley, Karen and Ted begin spending more time together -- which takes some crafty engineering on her part -- until finally Ted realizes Karen is the right woman for him.

This film combines so many of the things that I adore: Henie's skating, John Payne's singing, the Nicholas Brothers' dancing (with Dorothy Dandridge, Harold Nicholas's soon-to-be wife!), a charmingly daffy plot, and a tremendous score provided by Glenn Miller and His Orchestra. That score, by the way, includes the songs of Miller's that I cherish the most: Oscar-nominated "Chattanooga Choo Choo," "Moonlight Serenade," and "In the Mood." Sun Valley Serenade is also where the song "At Last" originated from. Written by Mack Gordon and Harry Warren specifically for the film, it was cut from the final product and saved for Glenn Miller's second (and final) movie, Orchestra Wives, but thankfully you can still hear instrumental pieces of the tune in a nightclub scene and in Henie's spectacular skating finale.

That finale, by the way, is the only flashy number in SVS and it is just the second time Henie skates, her other routine being much more informal with an almost improvisational feel. The finale is nothing short of magical. The use of the contrasting black and white mise-en-scene is exquisite, and the reflections of Henie and her chorus of skaters on the black ice create such a striking, elegant image. The camera doesn't stay static either, but instead glides right alongside Henie as if it were her partner.

Although Henie influenced figure skating immensely, contemporary audiences might be surprised by how much her skating differs from what you'd see pros like Kristi Yamaguchi, Michelle Kwan, or Dorothy Hamill doing. Henie's routines don't consist of complicated combinations, dramatic hand and arm gestures, or elongated glides. Rather than do triple Salchows and toe loops, she sticks with running across the ice on her toes, quick leaps, and absurdly fast spins that abruptly end with pretty poses. It is fascinating to watch, partly because we'll never see skating like this again.

Henie's films are wholly hers — she is the center of attention she is the reason why these movies exist. It is easy to scoff at these fluffy confections, but there are few movies today that can replicate the effortless, easygoing charm that these films and their star exuded. I also have to applaud Henie's confidence in herself and her abilities. She knew what she wanted and she fought for it, regardless of what others said. She created her own unique place in Olympic history, figure skating history, and, improbably, film history, all before the age of 25. I couldn't appreciate this woman's originality and fearlessness any more if I tried.

The crazy thing about SVS is that ever since I first saw it, it keeps popping into my life in unexpected ways. When I was studying abroad a few years ago, I was having lunch with another student and talking about why I enjoyed classic films when he suddenly said, "This is a really obscure one, but do you know Sun Valley Serenade? It was my grandmother's favorite movie." I almost fell out of my chair. That same feeling hit me again when I saw The Shape of Water (2017) in theaters and "I Know Why (and So Do You)" was used as the backdrop to a romantic montage. A more recent connection happened last year when my family was cleaning out my grandfather's house. I found this giant vinyl record compilation of Glenn Miller songs and I became downright giddy when I discovered that one whole record was the SVS soundtrack.

Frankly, it's kind of comforting that this movie seems to always be with me. In a way, it is indicative of how classic Hollywood has remained in pop culture and the public conscious, although it can feel like everyone would rather drool over the latest CGI nonsense than look at something as pure as Henie and Payne singing to each other in the glow of an isolated cabin's fireplace. It's also just nice to see that a little-known gem such as SVS can still be acknowledged and referenced almost 80 years after its release.

For me, SVS is what I call "cinematic comfort food," that type of irreplaceable film in your life that can cheer you up no matter what. Everything about it is cozy, from Glenn Miller's incomparable music to the snow-covered mountains to John Payne's reindeer sweater. Do yourself a big favor and check out the film here!


The world’s first Olympic ice queen became a Hollywood star — and a Hitler admirer

They are the stars of the Winter Olympics — appointment viewing on television, their every move equally calculated and scrutinized.

Every four years, one seems to become an instant celebrity — a bona fide diva and a household name.

The first ice queen was Norway’s Sonja Henie, an Olympian by age 11 who won three gold medals — in 1928, 1932 and 1936 — before becoming one of Hollywood’s biggest celebrities.

At the height of her off-ice fame, Henie, nicknamed the “Pavlova of the Ice,” was third at the box office, behind Clark Gable and Shirley Temple. Her cement prints on the sidewalk outside Grauman’s Chinese Theater in Hollywood include her palms, stilettos and skate blades. But her legacy has been complicated by her cozy relationship with Hitler.

Henie was 5 years old, the story goes, when her older brother, Leif, got a pair of ice skates for his birthday. Henie, already a precocious skier and swimmer, cried until her parents bought her a pair, too. Then they couldn’t drag her off the ice.

By age 8, she was the junior champion of Norway. By 10, the national champion. By 11, her star was born at the very first Winter Olympics, in 1924, even after she had to skate over to her coach in the middle of her program to ask what part of her routine to perform next.

Henie finished last of eight skaters, but the world’s fans forgave her. She had only skated for six years.

From a young age, Henie’s parents pulled her out of school and traveled with her abroad to bolster her skating prowess. She trained in London with acclaimed prima ballerina Tamara Karsavina and traveled Scandinavia for lessons with longtime Norwegian champion Martin Stixrud.

Early on, Henie developed a balletic style that defined an era of figure skating. She floated around the ice smoothly and extended her frame into graceful lines during spins and twists. Her smile seemed to beam into arenas’ rafters.

“She absolutely radiated joy on the ice,” said Roy Blakey, who runs the website IceStage Archive, a seven-decade study of ice skating on the silver screen. “When she skates zooming around on the ice, you get the feeling that she’s really enjoying that. And it paid off. The audience responded. They’d never seen anything like that before.”

By age 14, Henie started an historic streak of 10 consecutive world championships and was the prohibitive favorite in the 1928 Olympics in St. Moritz, Switzerland. What’s more, audiences had taken to her style of dress: short skirts — cut two inches above the knee, according to the Associated Press at the time — that whirled up in the air around her waist during spins.

She won the gold medal in women’s singles in St. Moritz, then defended her title in the 1932 games in Lake Placid, N.Y., and the 1936 games in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany.

Performing in Germany ahead of those games, she offered a Nazi salute to Adolf Hitler. He congratulated her rinkside after she won her third consecutive Olympic gold medal and invited her family to lunch.


Watch the video: HD Tonya Harding - 1994 Lillehammer Olympic - Free Skating (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Kagarn

    Fly away

  2. Taneli

    Gorgeous, where can I get it?

  3. Maerewine

    Which curious topic

  4. Ram

    I apologize, it doesn't come close to me. Are there other variants?



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