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Dilip Sarkar

Dilip Sarkar


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The summer of 1940 remains a pivotal moment in modern British history - still inspiring immense national pride and a global fascination.

The Fall of France was catastrophic. Britain stood alone and within range of German air attack. America, with its vast resources was neutral, Hitler's forces unbeaten, the outlook for Britain bleak. As Britain's wartime leader, Winston Churchill, rightly predicted, the Battle of Britain is about to begin'.

Famously, Churchill mobilised the English language, emboldening the nation with rousing rhetoric. In this darkest of hours, Churchill told the people that this was, in fact, their Finest Hour', a time of unprecedented courage and defiance which defined the British people. Connecting the crucial battle with Shakespeare's heroic Henry V and Agincourt, Churchill also immortalised Fighter Command's young aircrew as the Few' - to whom so many owed everything.

The Few comprised nearly 3,000 aircrew, 544 of which gave their lives during the Battle of Britain's sixteen weeks of high drama. Arguably, however, the official dates of 10 July - 31 October 1940 are arbitrary, the fighting actually ongoing before and afterwards. Many gave their lives whose names are not included among the Few, as, of course, did civilians, seamen and ground staff - which is not overlooked in this ground-breaking book.

In this unique study, veteran historian and author Dilip Sarkar explores the individual stories of a wide selection of those who lost their lives during the Finest Hour', examining their all-too brief lives and sharing these tragic stories - told here, in full, for the first time. Also included is the story of a German fighter pilot, indicating the breadth of investigation involved.

Researched with the full cooperation of the families concerned, this work is a crucial contribution to the Battle of Britain's bibliography.
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Description

The summer of 1940 remains a pivotal moment in modern British history – still inspiring immense national pride and a global fascination.

The Fall of France was catastrophic. Britain stood alone and within range of German air attack. America, with its vast resources was neutral, Hitler’s forces unbeaten, the outlook for Britain bleak. As Britain’s wartime leader, Winston Churchill, rightly predicted, ‘the Battle of Britain is about to begin’.

Famously, Churchill mobilised the English language, emboldening the nation with rousing rhetoric. In this darkest of hours, Churchill told the people that this was, in fact, their ‘Finest Hour’, a time of unprecedented courage and defiance which defined the British people. Connecting the crucial battle with Shakespeare’s heroic Henry V and Agincourt, Churchill also immortalised Fighter Command’s young aircrew as the ‘Few’ – to whom so many owed everything.

The Few comprised nearly 3,000 aircrew, 544 of which gave their lives during the Battle of Britain’s sixteen weeks of high drama. Arguably, however, the official dates of 10 July – 31 October 1940 are arbitrary, the fighting actually ongoing before and afterwards. Many gave their lives whose names are not included among the Few, as, of course, did civilians, seamen and ground staff – which is not overlooked in this ground-breaking book.

In this unique study, veteran historian and author Dilip Sarkar explores the individual stories of a wide selection of those who lost their lives during the ‘Finest Hour’, examining their all-too brief lives and sharing these tragic stories – told here, in full, for the first time. Also included is the story of a German fighter pilot, indicating the breadth of investigation involved.

Researched with the full cooperation of the families concerned, this work is a crucial contribution to the Battle of Britain’s bibliography.


Orkney Adventure (Did they all survive?)

November 1940, the night train to Edinburgh leaving Kings Cross passengers including an apprehensive 11 year old with her mother and brother bound for Thurso and thence the boat to Stromness.
I had no conception of what the Orkneys were like. I had just started a new grammar school in Slough I had no wish to be uprooted from my new exciting life. As the train drew out the sirens were sounding and my mother was anxious to leave London behind. We were going to be re-united with my father working on something ‘hush hush’. Later we found his company — Balfour Beatty were constructing the Churchill barrier at Scapa Flow. My memory of that journey is still with me. Staggering half asleep across Edinburgh Station to change trains at 3 o’clock in the morning — onto Inverness and then Thurso — the longest journey I have ever made. Overnight in The Royal Hotel Thurso and to the S.S. St Ola en route to Stromness. For November, the notorious Pentland Firth was remarkably calm (subsequent trips were not so good!!) We stood on deck and watched the islands come into view the Old man of Hoy and then the mainland. I remember my mother being very impressed because the boat had been used for a film ‘The Spy in Black’ (she was a fan of Conrad Veidt). Pitch black Orkney — miles of nothing! And the wind — I still hate windy weather!! We were housed temporarily with a lady called Mrs Wallace and her old father — who looked like Father Christmas — she gave us a meal of ‘tatties and neep’, I remember my brother and I were less than delighted. We later moved to a furnished apartment in Kirkwall — Matches Square — the toilet was outside — not pleasant in cold winter weather as this involved 20 or so stone steps down. Try that in snow and ice.
I started school at Kirkwall Grammar School and adjusted slowly to the different teaching system, I made a few friends — although they said I sounded Cockney — I still wished I was back home though — raids or not. There was little to show that we were at war. I don’t recall being short of any food and I did get my first kiss from a boy — when I was 13! During our 2 years stay, we had 2 air raids — each on a day of mock invasion exercises — and I remember my dad looking at rocket guns being tested on one of those days — now what does that tell you? The time I recall with most clarity is our last 3 months there. I spent those months in East Bank Isolation Hospital with diphtheria — two of my school friends sadly died from the disease. During this time I met some members of the forces also spending time isolated, 3 young lads with chickenpox and a Major in the R.E. suffering from mumps. All of them signed my autograph book and I often wondered if any survived the war and indeed are still alive now. I wonder too of the dedicated staff of the hospital — all in my now battered old book along with teachers from the school who wrote a few witty remarks when I left. Probably these are long gone, but maybe there is a possibility that the young soldiers on my ‘wall of friendship’, may have made it to 1945 and who knows maybe are still alive — I would love to know — if they are around — in their 80s, I imagine and I hope they survived the war. Privates A. Dawson, S. Pearson, and A. Knapp and Major H.A. Holt, who I fear would no longer be around as he was older. The boys couldn’t have been any more than 18-21.

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COVID-19: a review

The enduring epidemic outbreak which started in Wuhan city of China, in December 2019 caused by the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID- 19) or the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has created a dangerous and deadly Public Health disaster of International apprehension, with cases confirmed in several countries. This novel community health trouble is frightening the universe with clinical, psychological, emotional, collapse of health system and economical slowdown in each and every part of the world infecting nearly 200 countries. A highly virulent and pathogenic COVID-19 viral infection with incubation period ranging from two to fourteen days, transmitted by breathing of infected droplets or contact with infected droplets, belongs to the genus Coronavirus with its high mutation rate in the Coronaviridae. The likely probable primary reservoir could be bats, because genomic analysis discovered that SARSCoV-2 is phylogenetically interrelated to SARS-like bat viruses. The transitional resource of origin and transfer to humans is not known, however, the rapidly developing pandemic has confirmed human to human transfer. Approximately 1,016,128 reported cases, 211,615 recovered cases and 53,069 deaths of COVID-2019 have been reported to date (April 2, 2020). The symptoms vary from asymptomatic, low grade pyrexia, dry cough, sore throat, breathlessness, tiredness, body aches, fatigue, myalgia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, to severe consolidation and pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and multiple organ dysfunction leading to death with case fatality rate ranging from 2 to 3%.


The Raja Rajendra Maharaja Sarfoji Bhonsle Chatrapati of Tanjavur’s descendant daughter married in 1972, Raja Rajendra Sidhojirao of the main Shitole Raja branch of Pune. The Satara Senakartas, Bhoite Sarkars, current descendants married to the Shitole Deshmukhs of Patas, Kurkumbh on no. of occasion. The Shindes of Gwalior, Gaikwads of Baroda, Bhosales of Satara, Kolhapur, Nimbalkars of Wadgaon Nimbalkar, Dhamale of Shere, Kadam, Jadhavrao, More, Mahadik, Pawars of Dhar, Dewas, Ghorpade of Mudhol, Senapati Dabhade of Talegaon, Manes of Mhaswad etc. powerful Marathas married to the Shitoles scattered branches. The Ghatges of Kagal, Nayak of Sawana, Tahasil Shengaon, Dist.Hingoli are also relatives of Shitole.

  • H.E.Shrimant Rajrajendra Malojirao alias Balasaheb Narsinghrao Shitole married with H.E.Laxmibai alias Baijabai Shitole (present Rajmata of Sandur).
  • H.E. Shrimant Ladoji Shitole Deshmukh, Maratha Sardar relative and assistant of Shinde.
  • Urjitsigha Shitole Sarkar - Organizer of Saint DnyaneshwarAlandi Palkhi Festival.) Shitole sarkar, Shitole Wada situated at Kasba Peth, near Kasba Ganpati mandir- Pune city. Shitole Sarkar of Ankali, viz Mahadaji Shitole Sarkar, Anandsinh Dattajirao Shitole, Ashwath Ashokrao Shitole, Mansingh Ashokrao Shitole of Siddapurwadi

Ankali is a small town located in tq: Chikodi, Dist: Belgaum Ankali is a village that created its own identity in Karnataka as well as in Maharashtra. Ankali is an historic place owned by Shrimant Shitole Sarkar. People assume that a horse as a "MAULI" means Shri Sant Dnyaneshwar Maharaj's 'Ashwa'. Through this community all Ankalians and relatives of Ankalians get together in one arena. Shitole Deshmukhs are basically from Punawadi (PUNE). Near Pune, Roti, Lawale, Baner, Patas, Kusegaon,Kasarsai, Padavi and Ambewadi in Satara district, are their villages. Their chief deity (kuldevata) ROTMALNATH temple is at Roti village in Dound Tahsil of Pune district. They are Suryawanshi.


Battle of Britain 1940

The summer of 1940 remains a pivotal moment in modern British history – still inspiring immense national pride and a global fascination.

The Fall of France was catastrophic. Britain stood alone and within range of German air attack. America, with its vast resources was neutral, Hitler’s forces unbeaten, the outlook for Britain bleak. As Britain’s wartime leader, Winston Churchill, rightly predicted, ‘the Battle of Britain is about to begin’.

Famously, Churchill mobilised the English language, emboldening the nation with rousing rhetoric. In this darkest of hours, Churchill told the people that this was, in fact, their ‘Finest Hour’, a time of unprecedented courage and defiance which defined the British people. Connecting the crucial battle with Shakespeare’s heroic Henry V and Agincourt, Churchill also immortalised Fighter Command’s young aircrew as the ‘Few’ – to whom so many owed everything.

The Few comprised nearly 3,000 aircrew, 544 of which gave their lives during the Battle of Britain’s sixteen weeks of high drama. Arguably, however, the official dates of 10 July – 31 October 1940 are arbitrary, the fighting actually ongoing before and afterwards. Many gave their lives whose names are not included among the Few, as, of course, did civilians, seamen and ground staff – which is not overlooked in this ground-breaking book.

In this unique study, veteran historian and author Dilip Sarkar explores the individual stories of a wide selection of those who lost their lives during the ‘Finest Hour’, examining their all-too brief lives and sharing these tragic stories – told here, in full, for the first time. Also included is the story of a German fighter pilot, indicating the breadth of investigation involved.

Researched with the full cooperation of the families concerned, this work is a crucial contribution to the Battle of Britain’s bibliography.

DETAILS
By Dilip Sarkar MBE
Imprint: Air World
Format: E-book, Hardback
Pages: 392
Illustrations: 100
ISBN: 9781526775931
Published: 17th June 2020


You've only scratched the surface of Sarkar family history.

Between 1968 and 2004, in the United States, Sarkar life expectancy was at its lowest point in 1998, and highest in 1981. The average life expectancy for Sarkar in 1968 was 84, and 58 in 2004.

An unusually short lifespan might indicate that your Sarkar ancestors lived in harsh conditions. A short lifespan might also indicate health problems that were once prevalent in your family. The SSDI is a searchable database of more than 70 million names. You can find birthdates, death dates, addresses and more.


Oxford Racism Row: Hindu Students In Britain Demand Action Against Professor Abhijit Sarkar Over His Derogatory Remarks

Hindu students at various British Universities have launched a campaign urging action against the bigoted and derogatory comments of the controversial Hinduphobic faculty Abhijit Sarkar.

A video has been shared on the official Twitter handle of Hindus on Campus, a student-led movement that aims to create a safe space for diaspora Hindus, where two students can be heard demanding strict action against the oxford faculty.

They stated that the bigoted statements put out by Sarkar have compromised a safe space for Hindu students on Oxford university campuses. They also questioned whether Sarkar upheld the values of this prestigious college by making such statements.

Hindu students are delivering flyers at New College, Oxford University, urging action against the bigoted and derogatory comments of Abhijit Sarkar. They ask, does Sarkar uphold the values of this prestigious college? pic.twitter.com/eCtnHrEFw3

&mdash Hindu On Campus (@hinduoncampus) May 12, 2021

Sarkar, a Indian origin history lecturer at the Oxford University, had also led the Hinduphobic campaign against Rashmi Sawant, who had become the first Indian to have been elected the president of Oxford student union.

The hate campaign and targeted online abuse had resulted in the resignation of Samant from the Student’s Union.

Notably, Sarkar had led the charge against Samant, virtually dehumanising her and painting a target on her back. Sarkar who proudly boasts of having broken Saraswati idols has been accused of inciting religious hatred and bullying and harassment of Samant.

Soon after the controversy, Samant came back to India and had to be hospitalised due to stress.

She says that she doesn't feel safe going back to Oxford and that Sarkar's statement emboldened other students to continue their defamatory statements.

@UniofOxford as a former Visiting Fellow at Oxford I find faculty exhibiting views like this overtly against my faith indeed any faith, obscene offensive and probably criminal incitement to hatred. No Vice Chancellor should permit this. pic.twitter.com/kxEwyGsf0k

&mdash Alpesh B. Patel (@alpeshbp) March 1, 2021

At the same time, Sarkar also became involved in a controversy after several of his old misogynistic and vile tweets resurfaced on the internet.


Aviation History Book Reviews: Battle of Britain

Seventy years ago this past summer, two powerful air force rivals clashed in a contest that still stirs the imagination. The story of Winston Churchill’s gallant “Few” standing up to Adolf Hitler’s Luftwaffe has been told and retold, and as the anniversary year unfolds we can expect dozens of new volumes to add to the many hundreds—if not thousands—of books dealing with the Battle of Britain. We have here three noteworthy books that, for different reasons, stand apart from the pack.

Many of the new offerings can be described as “coffee table books”—long on glossy graphics and short on substance and analysis. It would be a mistake to lump Kate Moore’s The Battle of Britain into that category. True, it is beautifully illustrated. Photos, wartime posters and drawings, and even a pilot’s handwritten diary—mostly culled from the Imperial War Museum’s vast archives—make this one of the most attractive illustrated treatments to appear. The brief, authoritative text is a match for the graphics. Moore draws on the best of the secondary literature, enhanced with material from the IWM’s sound recordings collection, to produce a short account of the air battle that is both comprehensive and readable. Only a few erroneous photo captions mar an otherwise magnificent presentation.

Stephen Bungay’s The Most Dangerous Enemy originally appeared in 2000. This large-format, heavily illustrated edition preserves most of the original text, sacrificing only the source notes, orders of battle, epilogue and postscript. The photos are a mix of lesser-known and well-worn shots, augmented by new maps, charts and tables. Though the illustrations certainly add something, the real value of this book is that it is quite simply the best single-volume treatment of the battle to have appeared in 70 years—and there is some stiff competition. Bungay’s work covers the waterfront—technology, tactics, command and leadership, personal accounts and thorough discussions of subjects such as intelligence and aircraft production. He also provides a gripping day-by-day narrative of the air action that rests on superb research while at the same time conveying the struggle’s human drama. His overall interpretation—that the British victory was not due to “muddling through,” or solely the result of German blunders, but was rather the product of superior generalship—will stand the test of time.

Of the 2,936 Fighter Command aircrew members who flew in the battle, fewer than 100 survive today. Aerial combat in 1940 claimed some, many others did not survive the remainder of the war, and time has done in the rest. Dilip Sarkar has over the last 20 years interviewed hundreds of survivors, combining this priceless archive with additional research to produce more than a dozen books on the battle. Last of the Few emphasizes not the role of the well-known aces (only one of the 18 subjects of the book, George Unwin, qualifies as a familiar name) but the exploits of the self-acknowledged also-rans of the battle. The focus here is on pilots with few kills, who served with the less prominent 10 and 13 Groups, or were otherwise denied the limelight—and whose collective contribution to the RAF’s victory is uncontested. Most were interviewed by Sarkar, but one squadron leader, Brian Lane, died in action in 1942. Building on recollections of squadron mates, Sarkar reconstructs the story of this gifted leader.

A consistent theme is the survivors’ humility. Most are reluctant to discuss their own exploits one even notes, “It is sad that the best pilots seemed to get killed whilst the‘hams’ like me survived.” Future generations of aviation historians are in Sarkar’s debt.

Originally published in the November 2010 issue of Aviation History. To subscribe, click here.


Watch the video: 2021 09 02 কভড এ যগ চকৎস Yoga Therapy for COVID 19 Dilip Sarkar CH i (June 2022).


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