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Alex Raisbeck

Alex Raisbeck


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Alexander Raisbeck was born in Wallacestone, Scotland, on 26th December 1878. He played for Larkhall Thistle and Royal Albert before joining Hibernian in the Scottish League.

Raisbeck signed for Stoke City in the Football League in March 1898. Two months later he joined Liverpool for a fee of £350. He made his debut for the club in a 4-0 win over Sheffield Wednesday in September 1898.

Liverpool won the First Division championship in 1900-01. The stars of the side included Raisbeck, Sam Raybould, John Walker, John Robertson, Jack Cox, Rab Howell and Billy Dunlop.

Tony Matthews argues in Who's Who of Liverpool that: "Alex Raisbeck was quick in recovery, smart in the tackle, brilliant in the air and a clean kicker of the ball - a commanding figure generally."

Raisbeck won his first international cap for Scotland against England on 7th April 1900. Scotland won the game 4-1.

Liverpool finished 11th (1901-02), 5th (1902-03) and 17th (1903-04). Once again Liverpool was relegated into the Second Division of the Football League.

In 1904 Liverpool signed Ted Doig from Sunderland for a fee of £150. In his first season with the club he helped them gain promotion to the First Division of the Football League. Liverpool won the First Division title in the 1905-06 beating Preston North End by four points.

Alex Raisbeck won his last international cap for Scotland against England on 6th April 1907. Over a seven year period he was selected eight times for his country, five of them as captain.

Raisbeck joined Partick Thistle in the Scottish League for a fee of £500 in June 1909. During his time at Liverpool he scored 21 goals in 340 games.

In April 1914 Raisbeck became secretary-manager of Hamilton Academical. He held similar posts at Bristol City (1921-1929), Halifax Town (1930-1936) and Chester City (1936-1938). After the Second World War Raisbeck worked as a scout for Liverpool.

Alex Raisbeck died in Liverpool on 12th March 1949.


The Partick Thistle Historian

“Early on in the close season of 1909 I ran up against Director Lindsay, who, it will be remembered, was present when I became a Partick player. I was doing nothing special at the time, I had no where in particular to go and so when asked by Mister Lindsay to go and have a look at their new enclosure I was only too willing to accept his invitation. My first impressions of Firhill I shall never forget them. When I entered what was supposed to be the playing field I could not help but smile and remark to Director Lindsay, “Are we going to play here this August or next?”

You ought to have seen it. One half of the playing field was not so bad. It was kin’ o’ level, but oh! the other half! Tons of rubbish were heaped up here and there and one would have been lucky to find a blade of grass. I tell you I nearly had a fit when I saw what I had come to after the beautiful enclosure of Anfield. And I may just as well tell the truth - I was at the time sorry that I had left Liverpool. That was my first impression but not a lasting one I am pleased to say."

While I was playing I felt little the worse although at times I suffered much pain, especially on the days following a match. I could walk about and run a little but when I made an effort to reach anything with my leg a bug lump would appear on the injured limb only to disappear when I took matters easy.

I grew a bit uneasy at this swelling and was far from satisfied that I was doing the right thing in playing. As I was living out of Glasgow it was not always convenient for me to see the club doctor so he advised me to consult my own physician in Larkhall. I was advised by him to consult a professor.

When I called on the professor he told me that I might play for twenty years without doing myself any injury but if I received a knock on the injured part it might prove dangerous. He advised me to undergo an operation and I wasted little time after receiving his advice. It was afternoon when I called at his consulting rooms and I was in bed in McAlpine’s Home in Glasgow that same evening by eight o’clock after marking the journey from Larkhall. I was operated on the following morning, which happened to be Christmas Day. It was certainly the strangest Christmas I have ever spent. It was a wise course I was advised to take for my health has improved ever so much since."


The Partick Thistle Historian

“Early on in the close season of 1909 I ran up against Director Lindsay, who, it will be remembered, was present when I became a Partick player. I was doing nothing special at the time, I had no where in particular to go and so when asked by Mister Lindsay to go and have a look at their new enclosure I was only too willing to accept his invitation. My first impressions of Firhill I shall never forget them. When I entered what was supposed to be the playing field I could not help but smile and remark to Director Lindsay, “Are we going to play here this August or next?”

You ought to have seen it. One half of the playing field was not so bad. It was kin’ o’ level, but oh! the other half! Tons of rubbish were heaped up here and there and one would have been lucky to find a blade of grass. I tell you I nearly had a fit when I saw what I had come to after the beautiful enclosure of Anfield. And I may just as well tell the truth - I was at the time sorry that I had left Liverpool. That was my first impression but not a lasting one I am pleased to say."

While I was playing I felt little the worse although at times I suffered much pain, especially on the days following a match. I could walk about and run a little but when I made an effort to reach anything with my leg a bug lump would appear on the injured limb only to disappear when I took matters easy.

I grew a bit uneasy at this swelling and was far from satisfied that I was doing the right thing in playing. As I was living out of Glasgow it was not always convenient for me to see the club doctor so he advised me to consult my own physician in Larkhall. I was advised by him to consult a professor.

When I called on the professor he told me that I might play for twenty years without doing myself any injury but if I received a knock on the injured part it might prove dangerous. He advised me to undergo an operation and I wasted little time after receiving his advice. It was afternoon when I called at his consulting rooms and I was in bed in McAlpine’s Home in Glasgow that same evening by eight o’clock after marking the journey from Larkhall. I was operated on the following morning, which happened to be Christmas Day. It was certainly the strangest Christmas I have ever spent. It was a wise course I was advised to take for my health has improved ever so much since."


Alex Raisbeck

Alexander Galloway „Alex“ Raisbeck (* 26. Dezember 1878 in Polmont † 12. März 1949 in Liverpool) war ein schottischer Fußballspieler und Trainer. Der Mittelläufer war ab Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts einer der ersten „Stars“ des FC Liverpool und gewann als Kapitän 1901 sowie 1906 die ersten beiden englischen Meisterschaften in der Geschichte der „Reds“.

Alex Raisbeck
Personalia
Name Alexander Galloway Raisbeck
Geburtstag 26. Dezember 1878
Geburtsort Polmont, Schottland
Sterbedatum 12. März 1949
Sterbeort Liverpool, England
Position Mittelläufer
Herren
Jahre Station Spiele (Tore) 1
Blantyre Boys Brigade
Larkhall Thistle
Royal Albert
1896–1898 Hibernian Edinburgh 24 0 (2)
1898 FC Stoke 4 0 (0)
1898–1909 FC Liverpool 312 (18)
1909–1914 Partick Thistle 113 0 (7)
Hamilton Academical
Nationalmannschaft
Jahre Auswahl Spiele (Tore)
1900–1907 Schottland 8 0 (0)
Stationen als Trainer
Jahre Station
1914–1917 Hamilton Academical
1921–1929 Bristol City
1930–1936 Halifax Town
1936–1938 FC Chester
Bath City
1 Angegeben sind nur Ligaspiele.

Raisbeck wurde in Polmont geboren, einem kleinen Dorf in der Grafschaft Stirlingshire, das zum Verwaltungsbezirk Falkirk gehört. Das Fußballspielen erlernte er zunächst bei der „Blantyre Boys Brigade“ und nach weiteren Spielen für „Larkhall Thistle“ und „Royal Albert“ sammelte er erste Erfahrungen im schottischen Spitzenfußball, als er für Hibernian Edinburgh in der schottischen Football League zwischen 1896 und 1898 in insgesamt 24 Ligapartien zum Einsatz kam. Dort agierte er zumeist auf der Halbposition in der Defensivriege – primär im Zentrum und gelegentlich auf der linken Seite.

Im März 1898 wechselte Raisbeck in die englische Football League, kehrte dem Tabellenletzten FC Stoke aber nach nur zwei Monaten und vier Ligaeinsätzen wieder den Rücken. Tom Watson, Trainer des aufstrebenden FC Liverpool, verpflichtete den jungen Schotten für 350 Pfund und verhalf ihm am 3. September 1898 gegen The Wednesday zu seinem Debüt bei den „Reds“. Raisbeck entwickelte sich schnell zur Leit- und Führungsfigur in dem Abwehrverbund des FC Liverpool, war in Kopfballduellen – obwohl mit 1,78 Meter vergleichsweise klein – nur schwer zu bezwingen und zeichnete sich generell durch intelligente Tacklings aus. Folgerichtig machte ihn Watson bereits in jungen Jahren zum Mannschaftskapitän. Unter dessen Führung wurde das Team zu einem Meisterschaftsaspiranten und mit Spielern wie Jack Cox, Billy Dunlop, Rab Howell, Sam Raybould, John Robertson und John Walker gewann der erst neun Jahre zuvor gegründete Klub seinen ersten englischen Ligatitel. Auch außerhalb des Platzes war Raisbeck einer der ersten „Superstars“ im englischen Sport, der zudem für einen Fußballprofi der damaligen Zeit großen Wert auf ein gepflegtes Äußeres mit einem stets akkuraten Haarschnitt und Schnauzbart legte. Um die damals gültige Gehaltsobergrenze von vier Pfund zu umgehen, beschäftigte ihn der Verein zudem offiziell als Kontrolleur, der die öffentliche Werbung zu den Spielen des FC Liverpool zu überwachen hatte.

Sein zunehmender Stellenwert blieb auch der schottischen Heimat nicht verborgen und am 7. April 1900 absolvierte Raisbeck für die schottische Auswahl sein erstes Länderspiel, in dem der englische Erzrivale überzeugend mit 4:1 geschlagen wurde. Bis 1907 kam er noch zu sieben weiteren Einsätzen für Schottland, wobei er die „Bravehearts“ fünf Mal als Kapitän auf Feld führte. Im „Ligaalltag“ kehrte jedoch nach dem großen Meisterschaftserfolg Tristesse ein und nach zunehmend durchwachsenen Leistungen stieg der Klub nur drei Jahre später in die zweitklassige Second Division ab. Auf Anhieb gelang dem Klub aber über den Gewinn der Zweitligameisterschaft die Rückkehr in die englische Eliteklasse, wobei sich neben Raisbecks Führungsqualitäten die Verpflichtung des „Torhüter-Oldies“ Ted Doig aus Sunderland als Glücksfall herausstellte. Nur ein Jahr später gewann Raisbeck mit dem FC Liverpool seine zweite Meisterschaft und distanzierte den Zweitplatzierten Preston North End um vier Punkte. Drei Jahre spielte Raisbeck noch für die Reds, wobei sein Team, wie bereits nach dem ersten Meisterschaftserfolg, kein Aspirant mehr für den Ligatitel war.

Raisbeck zog es zurück nach Schottland und spielte dort bis 1914 für Partick Thistle. Seine letzte Station als aktiver Fußballer war Hamilton Academical, wo er später auch erstmals das Amt des Trainers ausübte und – wie zu dieser Zeit üblich – auch die Funktionen eines Vereinssekretärs übernahm. In ähnlicher Rolle arbeitete er später für Bristol City, Halifax Town, den FC Chester und Bath City, bevor er nach Liverpool zurückkehrte, um dort als Scout Talente für seinen ehemaligen Klub zu sichten. 70-jährig verstarb er dort am 12. März 1949.


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REMEMBERING LYNN THOMAS

We are all saddened by the passing of our leader and friend, Lynn Thomas, who recently lost his battle with cancer.

A life-long aviation enthusiast, Lynn pursued his passion for aviation both professionally and personally, making his first solo flight at the age of 16. Over the years, he continued to fly as often as possible, both for business and pleasure

Lynn joined Raisbeck Engineering in 2017, bringing his unique talent to the company where his drive and leadership contributed greatly to Raisbeck’s continued success. His experience and achievements in the general aviation industry included sales, business management and marketing with both aviation manufacturers and dealers. Lynn started his career working with major investment firms, including Everen Securities and Paine Weber.

Lynn took an active interest in all facets of the companies he represented. He was often spotted on the shop floor at Quest Aircraft or roaming the halls and main lobby at Banyan. Here at Raisbeck, Lynn always took the opportunity to spend time with the Raisbeck team to support their efforts.

In addition to Lynn’s passion for aviation, he was an avid outdoorsman. Whether fly fishing or paddling his hand-built canoe, he loved taking in the beauty found in nature.

He leaves us with a sense of great loss. Lynn has left an indelible mark on all of our lives and will be greatly missed. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family.


Alex Raisbeck - Liverpool

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Alex Raisbeck’s Reds enthral the masses as Liverpool secure first league title

In just their sixth season in the First Division, John Houlding’s Reds were crowned champions of England, swiftly making up for the heartbreaking second-place finish in 1898/99.

And with the spread of instantaneous news non-existent, Liverpool’s title triumph ensured the masses were in the dark until word filtered through.

Liverpool’s title run started with three successive victories as Tom Watson’s men found momentum on their side as points were dropped in just four games from the opening 11.

A 2-1 defeat to title-challengers Sunderland in September would be the first of three preceding a decisive and disappointing 3-2 defeat at The Wednesday.

The Reds’ inability to find an equaliser in Sheffield despite their efforts preceded a winter slump which threatened their bid to finish the campaign in historic fashion.

In the ten games which followed, Liverpool would lose four, draw three and win three, leaving the local press at a loss in regards to their form:

“The question now agitating most minds is whether Liverpool intend scoring any points in this season’s League tourney. On present form, they are not likely to do so.”

And it was a run which included a deflating 2-1 defeat at the hands of Everton, a result which ensured Watson’s side would take just one point from their meetings with their local rivals.

But while the loss was a humiliating one in woeful weather conditions, which almost saw the match abandoned, Liverpool would prove to have the last laugh come the end of April.

Before then, however, Liverpool had a job to do as by the time their winter simp hit the ten-game mark, they sat eighth in the league, nine points off the top with a trip to second-placed Sunderland next on the agenda.

With Watson’s side failing to find consistency and without the momentum they had started the campaign with, few gave them a chance to cause an upset and reset their title hopes.

If they were to claw their way back they could ill afford to taste further defeat in the fixture, let alone in the last 11 games which followed. And, thankfully, they did not.

Jack Cox broke the deadlock in the 62nd minute at Roker Park and Liverpool held on to breathe new life into their season.

The victory was the catalyst of what be a historic and memorable campaign, as after the game at Sunderland they would win six and draw three of their next nine to climb back to the top two with just two games remaining.

On April 27, 1901, Liverpool would meet fourth-placed Nottingham Forest in their final home game of the season and the penultimate match of the campaign.

The permutations were clear. A win would see the Reds draw level with leaders Sunderland, who had played one game more, and provide the chance to clinch the title at West Brom two days later.

Over 20,000 people were in attendance at Anfield for what was widely looked at as the league decider and after Forest were forced to play on with 10 men through injury, with no substitutes at the time allowed, Liverpool took immediate advantage.

“Robertson shot hard, and struck one of the goal posts, and rebounded to Cox, who promptly fastened on and placed the ball past Linacre. Liverpool’s goal, being cheered to the echo,” was how the Reds’ opening goal in the 25th minute was reported by the Liverpool Echo.

The result moved the Reds level with Sunderland at the top, a position they would strengthen when Bill Goldie added the second to put the result beyond doubt with 55 minutes on the clock.

With Sunderland having finished their campaign with 43 points and a superior goal difference, the Reds need only to avoid defeat at the already relegated West Brom to be crowned champions.

“The weather was far from favourable and greatly affected the attendance,” reported the Daily Post as a measly 4,000 turned up.

And while the Baggies had little to fight for, many expected them to fall at the will of the champions-elect but, as ever, Liverpool were forced to do it the hard way.

West Brom proved a stubborn unit and proved to be no walkover, but Johnny Walker’s 20th-minute strike would prove enough having capitalised on goalkeeper Joe Reader’s blunder.

Liverpool would hold on and leave the Hawthorns as the champions of England for the first time in the club’s history, with Alex Raisbeck earning the title of the club’s first league-winning captain.

Over 60,000 people would greet Liverpool on their return to the city after news filtered through of their success, where the team made their journey from the station to the Sandon Pub on the back of a cart pulled by horses.

It was a celebration to remember for all those involved and one which would precede many more for Liverpool Football Club.

* This is part of a new series aimed at filling the void without football, looking at the greatest moments in the history of the Reds. We’ll be publishing new stories from Liverpool’s glorious past each day at 7am and 7pm (UK).


Club career

Scotland

After playing for a youth team sponsored by a local church, Raisbeck joined Larkhall Thistle at the age of thirteen and was placed in the club&aposs third team. However, after a single season, he was promoted to the first-team and started playing in the unfamiliar outside right position. He later commented on his belief that the club&aposs selection committee "must have noticed my extraordinary tendency to wander into the middle of the field" and he eventually switched to playing as a defender. [4]

Two of his brothers, Willie and Andrew, were also part of the Larkhall Junior side and the trio helped the side to win their first trophy since the club was founded. His performances were brought to the attention of Hibernian player Joe Murphy, [5] known commonly as Judge as he wore a wig, who visited Raisbeck&aposs family home to try to convince him to join the club. At the time, Raisbeck had actually given up on playing football due to a knee injury but was eager to leave his mining job and signed for the club on 30 July 1896. [4] Despite looking to leave the mining profession, Raisbeck later commented on his desire to learn the trade, stating footballers "who have no trade will have to turn their hands to menial labour, [. ] the skilled trades will be able to command the standard rate of wages." [6]

Raisbeck made his professional debut for Hibernian less than two months after signing, playing in a 2𠄲 draw with Abercorn on 12 September 1896, [7] and scored his first goal for the club in the reverse fixture against Abercorn in a 9𠄰 victory. [8] He made ten appearances in all competitions during the season, helping Hibs to second place, and impressed selectors enough to be called up to the Scottish League XI as a reserve player for a match against their Irish counterparts. However, Alex Keillor later withdrew from the squad which allowed Raisbeck to start the match played at Solitude. [9]

At the age of seventeen, Raisbeck travelled to Aberdour with the Hibernian squad for a training camp. During a dinner, he rushed to finish his soup during a heated discussion and swallowed a small bone that became lodged in his throat players and coaches made frantic attempts to help Raisbeck as he struggled to breathe and began to lose consciousness before club trainer Paddy Canon was able to hit him hard enough on the back to dislodge the bone. [4] In his second season at Hibernian, he missed just two league matches as Hibernian finished in third place. [7]

Stoke

At the end of the 1897� season, Raisbeck and Hibs teammate Jack Kennedy joined Stoke on a short term deal for two months. English clubs would frequently bring in Scottish players temporarily to bolster their squad in the final matches of the season. He played four league matches for the club as they finished bottom of the Football League First Division and were entered into Football League test matches, a four team mini-league where the bottom two clubs in the First Division and the top two clubs in the Second Division played each other once with the top two playing in the First Division the following season. [4] He played in all four test matches as Stoke finished top of the mini-league, [2] although all four teams were allowed into the First Division as the Football League decided to expand the number of teams. [4]

Liverpool

Stoke hoped to sign Raisbeck on a permanent basis and made an appointment with manager Horace Austerberry to discuss terms. However, Austerberry failed to arrive for the meeting and Raisbeck later met Liverpool manager Tom Watson at the home of the Hibernian chairman. [2] [4] Watson quickly made him an offer to join Liverpool and the transfer was completed on 6 May 1898. He was welcomed to the club with a Lancashire hotpot dinner, a tradition for Liverpool to initiate new players. [4] One of several Scottish players in the squad, Raisbeck commented that he was "welcomed with open arms" and "felt at home right away" and became particularly good friends with fellow Scot John Walker. [10]

After a twelve week training camp near Blackpool, he made his debut in a First Division match against Sheffield Wednesday on 3 September 1898. Liverpool reached the semi-final of the FA Cup in his first season at the club, playing a four game tie against Sheffield United. Liverpool had led 2𠄱 and 4𠄲 in the original tie and first replay before drawing both matches after conceding late goals and a second replay was abandoned with Liverpool leading 1𠄰 after Sheffield fans ran onto the pitch on more than one occasion. Liverpool would eventually lose 1𠄰 in a fourth match and Raisbeck would be called into a hearing by a disciplinary panel after Liverpool players " severely jostled" the referee at the end of the match having been aggrieved at his decisions. The referee believed Raisbeck had witnessed the incident and asked him to name the players responsible but Raisbeck refused, later stating "I did not think any of our players had had anything to do with the demonstration". [10] Along with teammates Walker and William Goldie, he was reported by the referee over the incident but was later cleared of any wrongdoing. In the league, Liverpool finished as runners-up to Aston Villa after losing their final match of the season. [10]

After two seasons at Anfield, Raisbeck was appointed club captain and led Liverpool to their first ever league title in 1900�. They claimed the title after defeating West Bromwich Albion in the final game of the season. Following their victory, the team were cheered off at Birmingham Snow Hill railway station by West Brom fans before being greeted by around 50,000 fans upon their return to Liverpool Central railway station. [10] In April 1901, the Football League introduced a ਴ weekly maximum wage for footballers which severely impacted Liverpool who were seen as one of the higher paying teams in England. To try and ensure they could pay their players extra money, they would assign players jobs within the club that they could be paid for. Raisbeck himself was employed as a bill inspector, his job being to monitor public notice boards to check whether they were correctly advertising the club&aposs fixtures. [11]

Three years after the club won the league title, they suffered relegation to the Second Division. Raisbeck had considered leaving Liverpool at the start of the 1903� season but changed his mind when they were relegated, stating "I simply could not leave my club in its day of disaster." [12] He remained with the club and helped them win promotion back to the First Division after a single season after recording a record points total, with only goalkeeper Ned Doig making more appearances during the course of the season. [13] On their return to the First Division, the Liverpool board decided to form the club into a limited company. When the players were informed of the decision by manager Watson during a training camp in The Midlands, several senior players, including Raisbeck, decided to invest in shares of the club with ten of the fifteen players at the camp choosing to purchase shares. [14]

In their first season back in the First Division, Raisbeck enjoyed his most successful campaign with the club as he helped them to lift the league title, the Sheriff of London Charity Shield and the Liverpool Senior Cup. [14] In the FA Cup, Liverpool were defeated by local rivals Everton in the semi-finals. Prior to the match, as captain, Raisbeck had met with the club&aposs directors and pushed for the inclusion of Sam Raybould in the starting line-up which was agreed after it was confirmed that he had sufficiently recovered from injury. However, some players later met with the directors and convinced them to drop Raybould and gave the directors the impression that Raisbeck was in agreement with this decision. The directors relented and the team was rearranged without Raisbeck&aposs knowledge. He would later comment on the changes which left several players out of position for the match, stating " our forwards were all out of tune and they did little that was right. We lost, but I still feel it was an error of judgement which deprived Liverpool of competing in the final." [14]

As a reward for winning the First Division title, the Liverpool squad were sent to Paris for a team holiday where they met swimmer John Arthur Jarvis following his victory in a race in the Seine. [15] In his later years with Liverpool, mounting injuries began to take their toll on Raisbeck&aposs body and his appearances for the club steadily decreased each season. [2] During the 1908� season, he developed a knee injury that kept him out of the first-team for four months and the extended time away from the club led him to become homesick and he eventually informed the club of his wish to return to Scotland. The club&aposs board were initially unwilling to allow their captain to leave but relented when he told them it was for health reasons. [15] He played his final match for the club on 30 April 1909, a 1𠄰 victory over Newcastle United that saw Liverpool avoid relegation. [15] During his time at Anfield, he made 341 appearances in all competitions, scoring 19 goals. [2]

Partick Thistle

Raisbeck&aposs teammate Maurice Parry was out of contract at Liverpool at the end of the 1908� season and was in talks with Scottish side Partick Thistle over a potential move. Thistle club secretary George Easton, a friend of Raisbeck, approached him for his opinion on Parry and during their conversation he remarked to Easton over his desire to move. Easton quickly contacted Liverpool and the transfer was completed soon after for a fee of 򣔀. [16] [17] The team had finished bottom of the Scottish First Division the previous season but were due to move into their new ground Firhill and Raisbeck and Parry were part of several signings brought in to boost the club&aposs fortunes. [17]

He was appointed club captain on his arrival and went on to make over 100 appearances for the club during a five-year spell. In his final season at Partick, Raisbeck sustained a blow to the abdomen during a league match against Dundee but played on after an initial wave of pain. However, in the dressing room after the match he experienced more pain and the club doctor advised that the injury was not serious but could lead to appendicitis. He played on for several matches but grew uneasy over the increased pain after matches and eventually sought further advice from a professor who advised him to undergo surgery, which took place on Christmas Day 1913 in Glasgow. [15] [18] The injury ruled him out of his benefit match and he never played a competitive match for Partick again. [15]


Raisbeck Alex Image 7 Liverpool 1906

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Description

Liverpool stalwart and captain centre half Alexander Galloway Raisbeck was the most successful footballer of a family that produced several professional footballing brothers, with Alex having by far the most successful and longest football career. Born at Wallacestone, Stirlingshire, he began his career with Blantyre Boys Brigade in 1893 and played for Larkhall Thistle in 1894 before joining Scottish League Royal Albert in 1895 and Hibernian in 1896.

He first played in England briefly for Stoke City on loan, making his Football League debut against Sheffield Wednesday in March 1898 and playing 4 games in the crucial 1898 Test Matches among his 8 games for The Potters, before joining Liverpool in May 1898 for £350. He was Liverpool’s club captain for their two League Championship wins in 1900-01 and 1905-06, as well as leading them to the Second Division Championship in 1904-05 after their relegation a year earlier and played 341 games scoring 19 goals for Liverpool over 11 years.

He won 8 caps for Scotland, 5 of them as captain, while at the club between 1900 and 1907. He was first capped in April 1900 against England in a 4-1 victory at Parkhead. Perhaps a sign of his magnitude was that 7 of his 8 caps came against The Auld Enemy, the selectors saving him for their most important fixtures, the only exception being a March 1903 match against Wales. He also represented The Scottish League 3 times at either end of his career, first playing for them in January 1897 when selected for a 2-0 win against The Irish League in Belfast, then twice more while with Partick Thistle, whom he joined from Liverpool in June 1909, playing against The Football League in a 1-1 draw at Ibrox in March 1911 and finally against The Irish League in a 3-1 win at Cliftonville’s Solitude Ground in November 1912. He retired as a player in 1914 after 9 goals in 138 appearances for Thistle.

He achieved legendary status at the club, where he is considered on a level alongside the likes of Billy Liddell, Kenny Dalglish and Steven Gerrard.

He was subsequently manager of Hamilton Academicals from 1914 to 1917, and his first English management position was with Bristol City, taking over at Ashton Gate in December 1921, leading them to the Third Division (South) Championship in both 1922-23 and 1926-27, before leaving in June 1929. In July 1930 he was appointed manager of Halifax Town and stayed until May 1936, leading them to runner up position (not good enough for promotion) in the Third Division (North) in 1934-35, before becoming manager of Chester in May 1936, leading them to third and ninth place finishes before leaving in May 1938, finally returning to the West Country in July 1938 as manager of non league Bath City whom he managed until the outbreak of the Second World War.

Of his brothers, Andrew played for Hibernian and Hull City, he was on the books at Liverpool but never made their first team Bill played for amongst others Hibernian, Sunderland, Derby County and Reading and first cousin Luke among others played for Middlesbrough, West Ham United and Blackpool.


Watch the video: Liverpool Legend - Alex Raisbeck (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Nouel

    och even!

  2. Mikagul

    I have to say this - confusion.

  3. Sicheii

    the phrase Faithful

  4. Cyneleah

    Waited



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