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16 January 1940

16 January 1940


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16 January 1940

War at Sea

The British Admiralty announces that three British submarines, Seahorse, Undine and Starfish have probably been lost

Winter War

The Finns destroy two Soviet companies on the Salla front

Soviet aircraft raid southern Finland



Important Events From This day in History January 16th

1995 : Avalanches following heavy rain sweep two buses off the highway between Srinagar and Jammu in Kashmir. Two more days of avalanches in the area eventually killed more than 200 people 5,000 others had to be rescued.

The fuel supply tanker 'Jessica' has run aground on the Island of San Cristobal in the Galapagos Islands, marine biologists are warning of an ecological disaster to the Archipelago. ( the ship did leak 180,000 gallons of oil which caused an ecological disaster with up to 62% of the marine iguana population on one island killed off.

Bank Of America the largest in the U.S. will receive $20bn in fresh US government aid and $118bn worth of guarantees against bad assets. This is in addition to the $25bn in capital injections from the Troubled Assets Relief Programme, known as Tarp Bank of America has already received.

Jon Huntsman, a candidate for the Republican presidential nomination announced that he was ending his race for the White House after coming in third in the New Hampshire primary. Huntsman ended his campaign by endorsing Mitt Romney as his choice for candidate.

2013 : A suicide attack in northern Iraq killed at least ten people and injured another ninety people outside an office of the Kurdish Democratric Party.

The first session of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon opened this day, nearly nine years after the assassination of Lebanon's former Prime Minister, Rafik Hariri, the main focus of the trial. The trial is the first in in legal history that would feature an international court to try a case based on terrorism charges. It is also the first trial since the Nuremberg trials that would look for prosecutions "in absentia" as all of the suspects have disappeared.


1995: Robert E. Brennan, former chairman of First Jersey Securities Inc., is ordered by a Federal judge to pay $71.5 million in fines and penalties for "massive and continuing" securities fraud. The judge rules that First Jersey -- whose TV commercials used to show Brennan next to his company helicopter, challenging viewers to "Come grow with us" -- cheated investors out of at least $27 million and illegally manipulated the prices of at least six penny stocks that it had underwritten.

The Wall Street Journal, June 21, 1995, p. B4.

1991: International Business Machines Corp. warns that its second-quarter revenues will fall at least 5% and that it will miss analysts' earnings estimates of nearly $1 per share by roughly 50 cents. That's IBM's first decline in annual revenues since 1946, sending Wall Street analysts into a deep funk about the future of technology stocks. However, some do see a few bargains out there: Barry Willman of Sanford C. Bernstein recommends Digital Equipment, Steve Milunovich of Salomon Bros. likes Data General, and Mark Stahlman of Alex. Brown is bullish on Commodore International. (Within a few years, none of them will still exist as a public company.)


Pittsburgh Genealogy (in Allegheny County, PA)

NOTE: Additional records that apply to Pittsburgh are also found through the Allegheny County and Pennsylvania pages.

Pittsburgh Birth Records

Pittsburgh Cemetery Records

All Saints Catholic Cemetery Billion Graves

Allegheny Cemetery Billion Graves

Allegheny Cemetery, Ver. 1 US Gen Web Archives

Allegheny Cemetery, Ver. 2 US Gen Web Archives

Allegheny Cemetery: Historical Account of Incidents and Events Historic Pittsburgh

Beth Abraham Cemetery US Gen Web Archives

Beulah Presbyterian Cemetery Billion Graves

Birmingham Cemetery US Gen Web Archives

Calvary Cemetery Billion Graves

German Cemetery Billion Graves

Heinz Memorial Chapel Billion Graves

Highwood Billion Graves

Highwood Cemetery Billion Graves

Hollywood Cemetery Billion Graves

Holy Trinity Serbian Orthodox Cemetery US Gen Web Archives

Homewood Cemetery US Gen Web Archives

Homewood Cemetery Billion Graves

Loretto Cemetery Billion Graves

Minersville Cemetery US Gen Web Archives

Mount Pisgah Cemetery Billion Graves

Northside Catholic Cemetery US Gen Web Archives

Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh, Allegheny Cemetery Records, 1845 - 1960 Family Search

Poale Zedeck Sheraden Cemetery US Gen Web Archives

Prospect Cemetary Billion Graves

Saint George Cemetery Billion Graves

Saint Joseph Cemetery Billion Graves

Saint Martin Cemetery Billion Graves

Saint Michael's Cemetery Billion Graves

Saint Nicholas Cemetery Billion Graves

Saint Wendelin Billion Graves

Shaare Torah Cemetery US Gen Web Archives

Shaare Zedeck Cemetery US Gen Web Archives

Smithfield East End Cemetery US Gen Web Archives

Smithfield East End Cemetery Billion Graves

Southside Cemetery US Gen Web Archives

St Michael Cemetery US Gen Web Archives

St. Adalbert Cemetery US Gen Web Archives

St. John Vianney Cemetery US Gen Web Archives

St. Peter's Cemetery Billion Graves

St. Peter's Lutheran Cemetery US Gen Web Archives

Tree of Life Memorial Park Billion Graves

Trinity Episcopal Church Cemetery US Gen Web Archives

Troy Hill Cemetery US Gen Web Archives

Union Dale Cemetery US Gen Web Archives

Union Dale Cemetery Billion Graves

Pittsburgh Census Records

United States Federal Census, 1790-1940 Family Search

Pittsburgh Church Records

60th Anniversary of Most Holy Name Church Part 1 US Gen Web Archives

60th Anniversary of Most Holy Name Church Part 2 US Gen Web Archives

A History of the Catholic Church in the Dioceses of Pittsburg and Allegheny from its Establishment to the Present Times Historic Pittsburgh

Calvary church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Genealogy Gophers

Centennial Volume of the First Presbyterian Church of Pittsburgh, PA., 1784-1884 Historic Pittsburgh

Early Pittsburgh Presbyterianism: Tracing the Development of the Presbyterian Church, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania from 1758-1839 Historic Pittsburgh

Fiftieth Anniversary of the founding of the German Evangelical Protestant Smithfield Church (Congregational) Pittsburgh, 1932 Historic Pittsburgh

Historical sketch of the sabbath schools connected with the First Presbyterian Congregation of Pittsburgh from A.D. 1800 to A.D. 1867 Genealogy Gophers

History of the Churches of the Pittsburgh Baptist association Historic Pittsburgh

History of the First United Presbyterian Church of Pittsburgh, Pa., 1801-1901 Historic Pittsburgh

History of the Pittsburgh Synod of the General Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, 1748-1845-1904 Historic Pittsburgh

Manual and Directory of Smithfield St. M.E. Church for 1888 Historic Pittsburgh

St. Peter's Catholic Church Jubilee - 1924 US Gen Web Archives

The History of the Pittsburgh Synod of the Reformed Church in the United States Historic Pittsburgh

The Jewish community of Pittsburgh, December, 1938: a Sample Study Historic Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh City Directories

General catalogue 1819-1896, University of Pittsburgh Genealogy Gophers

Harris' business directory of the cities of Pittsburgh & Allegheny : also the boroughs of 1844 Internet Archive

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, city directory, 1920 Internet Archive

The Pittsburgh Directory for 1815 : Containing the Names, professions, and Residence of the Heads of Families Internet Archive

White Pages, Pittsburgh August 1949 Library of Congress

White Pages, Pittsburgh July 1951 Library of Congress

White Pages, Pittsburgh, August 1960 Library of Congress

White Pages, Pittsburgh, December 1964 Library of Congress

White Pages, Pittsburgh, December 1967 Library of Congress

White Pages, Pittsburgh, December 1968 Library of Congress

White Pages, Pittsburgh, December 1970 Library of Congress

White Pages, Pittsburgh, December 1971 Library of Congress

White Pages, Pittsburgh, December 1972 Library of Congress

White Pages, Pittsburgh, December 1973 Library of Congress

White Pages, Pittsburgh, December 1974 Library of Congress

White Pages, Pittsburgh, December 1975 Library of Congress

White Pages, Pittsburgh, November 1962 Library of Congress

White Pages, Pittsburgh, November 1963 Library of Congress

White Pages, Pittsburgh, September 1961 Library of Congress

White and Yellow Pages - Pittsburgh June 1913 through November 1931 Library of Congress

White and Yellow Pages - Pittsburgh Summer 1932 Library of Congress

White and Yellow Pages, Pittsburgh July 1948 Library of Congress

White and Yellow Pages, Pittsburgh July 1950 Library of Congress

White and Yellow Pages, Pittsburgh, 1944 Library of Congress

White and Yellow Pages, Pittsburgh, April 1933 Library of Congress

White and Yellow Pages, Pittsburgh, August 1935 Library of Congress

White and Yellow Pages, Pittsburgh, February 1939 Library of Congress

White and Yellow Pages, Pittsburgh, July 1936 Library of Congress

White and Yellow Pages, Pittsburgh, July 1938 Library of Congress

White and Yellow Pages, Pittsburgh, July 1945 Library of Congress

White and Yellow Pages, Pittsburgh, July 1946 Library of Congress

White and Yellow Pages, Pittsburgh, March 1937 Library of Congress

White and Yellow Pages, Pittsburgh, November 1934 Library of Congress

White and Yellow Pages, Pittsburgh, November 1937 Library of Congress

Pittsburgh Death Records

Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh City Deaths, 1870-1905 Family Search

Pittsburgh Histories and Genealogies

A Century and a Half of Pittsburg and Her People, Vol. 1 Historic Pittsburgh

A Century and a Half of Pittsburg and Her People, Vol. 2 Historic Pittsburgh

A Century and a Half of Pittsburg and Her People, Vol. 3 Historic Pittsburgh

A Century and a Half of Pittsburg and Her People, Vol. 4 Historic Pittsburgh

A Chronological Table of the Judges and other Officers of Allegheny County, Pa Historic Pittsburgh

A History of the region of Pennsylvania north of the Ohio and West of the Allegheny River Historic Pittsburgh

A Place of Great Historic Interest Pittsburgh's First Burying-Ground Internet Archive

A century and a half of Pittsburgh and her people Genealogy Gophers

A short history of Pittsburgh, 1758-1906 Genealogy Gophers

America's Industrial Centre: Pittsburgh's Great Industries and its Enormous Development in the Leading Products of the World Historic Pittsburgh

Brief Biographical Sketches of the Deceased Bishops and Priests who Labored in the Diocese of Pittsburgh Historic Pittsburgh

Early History of the 15th Ward of the City of Pittsburgh,1925 US Gen Web Archives

History of Pittsburgh and environs, from prehistoric days to the beginning of the American revolution Genealogy Gophers

History of Pittsburgh and environs, from prehistoric days to the beginning of the American revolution, Vol. 3 Genealogy Gophers

History of Pittsburgh and environs, from prehistoric days to the beginning of the American revolution, vol. 1 Genealogy Gophers

History of Pittsburgh and environs, from prehistoric days to the beginning of the American revolution v. 06 Genealogy Gophers

In Memory of the Early Settlers of Squirrel Hill and their Descendants Historic Pittsburgh

J.M. Kelly's Handbook of Greater Pittsburg Historic Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh and Allegheny Illustrated Review: Historical, Biographical and Commercial Historic Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh: Commemorating the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Engineers' Society of Western Pennsylvania Historic Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh its Industry & Commerce Making of America

Right here in Pittsburgh Genealogy Gophers

The Book of Pittsburgh: Including Herein a Record of the Participation of the City of Pittsburgh in the Sesquicentennial International Exposition at Philadelphia Historic Pittsburgh

The Historical and other Relations of Pittsburgh and the Virginias Historic Pittsburgh

The History of Pittsburgh: its Rise and Progress Historic Pittsburgh

The History of Pittsburgh: with a Brief Notice of its Facilities of communication, and other Things Historic Pittsburgh

The Judiciary of Allegheny County Historic Pittsburgh

The inside history of the Carnegie Steel Company : a romance of millions Genealogy Gophers

Western Pennsylvanians : a work for newspaper and library reference Genealogy Gophers

Pittsburgh Immigration Records

Pennsylvania, Allegheny, Pittsburgh, Naturalization Card File Index, 1906-1990 Family Search

Pittsburgh Land Records

Early Land Marks and Names of Old Pittsburgh Historic Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh Map Records

Fisherman's guide map of, Pittsburgh District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers : hook, lyin', and sinker, 1985 Library of Congress

Map of Pittsburgh, Allegheny & Birmingham, 1871 Library of Congress

Map of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1902. Library of Congress

Map of Water and woodlands, recreation in the Pittsburgh District, 1996 Library of Congress

Pittsburg and Van Buren Township : pioneers, pictures, maps, stories and historical events, 1836-1976 Genealogy Gophers

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Hays, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, August 1917 Library of Congress

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Knoxville Borough, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, August 1898 Library of Congress

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Knoxville Borough, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, October 1893 Library of Congress

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 1884 Library of Congress

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 1884 Library of Congress

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 1893 Library of Congress

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 1893 Library of Congress

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 1893 Library of Congress

View map of Pittsburgh & Allegheny, 1874 Library of Congress

Pittsburgh Marriage Records

Pittsburgh Military Records

General History of Company D, 149th Pennsylvania Volunteers: and Personal Sketches of the Members Historic Pittsburgh

History of the Washington Infantry of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Thirty-Sixth Anniversary, 1855-1891 Historic Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh Minority Records

The Jewish community of Pittsburgh, December, 1938: a Sample Study Historic Pittsburgh

The Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project 1895-present Carnegie Mellon University

Pittsburgh Miscellaneous Records

Pittsburgh Newspapers and Obituaries

Allegheny Democrat, and Farmers' and Mechanics' Advertiser 08/29/1826 to 11/25/1828 Genealogy Bank

Commonwealth 07/24/1805 to 12/30/1812 Genealogy Bank

Daily Morning Post 9/10/1842 - 7/28/1843 Pennsylvania Civil War Newspapers

Daily Morning Post 9/17/1846 - 11/24/1855 (gaps) Pennsylvania Civil War Newspapers

Daily Pittsburgh Gazette 4/1/1847 - 1/8/1851 Pennsylvania Civil War Newspapers

Daily Pittsburgh Gazette 5/21/1863 - 1/6/1866 Pennsylvania Civil War Newspapers

Daily Pittsburgh Gazette and Commercial Journal 5/9/1861 - 5/20/1863 Pennsylvania Civil War Newspapers

Daily Pittsburgh Gazette, 1828, 1830, 1832, 1834-1842, 1849-1865 Google News Archive

Daily Union 11/10/1852 to 06/22/1858 Genealogy Bank

Daily morning post. 1842-09-10 to 1843-07-28 Pennsylvania Newspaper Archive

Druid 01/01/1919 to 06/01/1939 Genealogy Bank

Freiheits Freund Und Pittsburger Courier, 1834, 1838-1839, 1848, 1853-1854, 1858-1862, 1864-1866, 1868-1870 Google News Archive

Gazette Times 1910-1922 Newspapers.com

Gazette Times, 1906-1927 Google News Archive

Harris' Intelligencer, Commercial Reporter and General Advertiser 02/01/1840 to 03/28/1840 Genealogy Bank

Iron World and Manufacturer 10/24/1871 to 12/02/1873 Genealogy Bank

Kennedy's Bank Note and Commercial Review 03/01/1859 to 08/12/1859 Genealogy Bank

Mount Washington News, 1908, 1911-1912, 1916-1917, 1919, 1922, 1925, 1927-1928, 1930-1960, 1964, 1969, 1975 Google News Archive

NBC - 11 WPXI: Web Edition Articles 05/10/2013 to Current Genealogy Bank

National Labor Tribune 04/24/1875 to 11/01/1958 Genealogy Bank

National Labor Tribune, 1874-1883, 1887-1889, 1899-1906 Google News Archive

New Pittsburgh Courier 09/10/2009 to Current Genealogy Bank

New Pittsburgh Courier 09/10/2009 to Current Genealogy Bank

North Hills News Record 1972-1975 Newspapers.com

Pittsburg Dispatch 07/31/1856 to 03/17/1864 and 01/01/1889 to 12/31/1892 Genealogy Bank

Pittsburg Press, 1888-1992 Google News Archive

Pittsburg dispatch. (Pittsburg [Pa.]) (from Jan. 1, 1889 to Dec. 31, 1892) Chronicling America

Pittsburg dispatch. 1889-01-01 to 1892-12-31 Pennsylvania Newspaper Archive

Pittsburger Volksblatt, 1859-1900 Google News Archive

Pittsburgh Commercial 1845-1877 Newspapers.com

Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette 1897-1897 Newspapers.com

Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette, 1877-1901 Google News Archive

Pittsburgh Commercial, 1864-1876, 1879 Google News Archive

Pittsburgh Courier 1911-1977 Newspapers.com

Pittsburgh Daily American 1841-1841 Newspapers.com

Pittsburgh Daily Commercial 1863-1876 Newspapers.com

Pittsburgh Daily Commercial, 1863-1864 Google News Archive

Pittsburgh Daily Gazette and Advertiser 3/29/1847 - 3/31/1847 Pennsylvania Civil War Newspapers

Pittsburgh Daily Gazette and Advertiser, 1841, 1844-1847 Google News Archive

Pittsburgh Daily Gazette, 1847-1850, 1871-1872 Google News Archive

Pittsburgh Daily Post 1842-1927 Newspapers.com

Pittsburgh Dispatch 1889-1892 Newspapers.com

Pittsburgh Gazette 08/12/1786 to 01/01/1876 Genealogy Bank

Pittsburgh Gazette 1/8/1866 b  7/30/1870 Pennsylvania Civil War Newspapers

Pittsburgh Gazette 1834-1866 Newspapers.com

Pittsburgh Gazette, 1795-1797, 1805-1825, 1829-1835 Google News Archive

Pittsburgh Morning Post 11/26/1855 - 2/19/1859 (gaps) Pennsylvania Civil War Newspapers

Pittsburgh Morning Post 7/29/1843 - 9/16/1846 Pennsylvania Civil War Newspapers

Pittsburgh PA Courier 1923-1987 Fulton History

Pittsburgh Post 1868-1896 Newspapers.com

Pittsburgh Post 1894 Newspaper Archive at FindMyPast

Pittsburgh Post 2/21/1859 - 1/17/1860 Pennsylvania Civil War Newspapers

Pittsburgh Post Gazette, 1990-present Pittsburgh Post Gazette

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 05/29/1990 to Current Genealogy Bank

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 1877-2015 Newspapers.com

Pittsburgh Press 1884-1992 Newspapers.com

Pittsburgh Sun-Telegraph 1927-1960 Newspapers.com

Pittsburgh Tribune-Review 01/01/2001 to 11/30/2016 Genealogy Bank

Pittsburgh Weekly Gazette 1786-1925 Newspapers.com

Pittsburgh morning post. 1843-07-29 to 1846-09-16 Pennsylvania Newspaper Archive

Pittsburgh morning post. 1855-11-26 to 1858-10-15 Pennsylvania Newspaper Archive

Post-Gazette and Sun-Telegraph, 1960-1960 Google News Archive

Presbyterian Banner 3/10/1860 - 9/14/1864 Pennsylvania Civil War Newspapers

Presbyterian Banner and Advocate 9/27/1856 - 3/3/1860 (gaps) Pennsylvania Civil War Newspapers

Presbyterian banner & advocate. 1856-09-27 to 1860-03-03 Pennsylvania Newspaper Archive

Presbyterian banner. 1860-03-10 to 1864-09-14 Pennsylvania Newspaper Archive

Printers' labor tribune, 1873-1873 Google News Archive

Spirit of Liberty 09/11/1839 to 09/16/1843 Genealogy Bank

The Daily Pittsburgh gazette and commercial journal. 1861-01-01 to 1863-12-31 Pennsylvania Newspaper Archive

The Mystery 4/16/1845 Pennsylvania Civil War Newspapers

The Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project 1895-present Carnegie Mellon University

The Pittsburgh daily gazette. 1847-04-01 to 1851-01-08 Pennsylvania Newspaper Archive

The Pittsburgh gazette. 1866-01-08 to 1870-07-30 Pennsylvania Newspaper Archive

The Pittsburgh post. 1859-06-08 to 1864-12-31 Pennsylvania Newspaper Archive

The daily Pittsburgh gazette. 1851-01-09 to 1861-05-08 Pennsylvania Newspaper Archive

The daily Pittsburgh gazette. 1863-05-21 to 1866-01-06 Pennsylvania Newspaper Archive

The daily morning post. 1846-09-17 to 1855-11-24 Pennsylvania Newspaper Archive

Tree of Liberty 02/22/1801 to 05/24/1808 Genealogy Bank

Volksblatt und Freiheits-Freund, 1901-1942 Google News Archive

Weekly labor tribune, 1874-1874 Google News Archive

Offline Newspapers for Pittsburgh

According to the US Newspaper Directory, the following newspapers were printed, so there may be paper or microfilm copies available. For more information on how to locate offline newspapers, see our article on Locating Offline Newspapers.

Age. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1843-1845

Allegheny Bulletin. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1992-1993

Allegheny Democrat, and Farmers' and Mechanics' Advertiser. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1824-1825

Allegheny Democrat, and Working-Men's Advocate. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1838-1839

Allegheny Democrat. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1825-1826

Allegheny Democrat. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1832-1836

American Jewish Outlook. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1934-1962

American Manufacturer. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1830-1842

Bloomfield Journal. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1887-1888

Business Guide. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1870-1876

Butler County News Record. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1987-Current

Byzantine Catholic World. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1956-Current

Catholic Observer. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1923-1937

Catholic. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1855-1889

Christian Herald. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1829-1833

City Times. (Pittsburgh) 1980-Current

Clipper. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1886-1900

Commonwealth. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1805-1818

Courier [Electronic Resource]. (Pittsburgh. Pa.) 1950-1954

Courier [Microform]. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1950-1954

Courier. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1950-1954

Critic. (Pittsburgh [Pa.) 1875-1883

Daily Aurora. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1843-1844

Daily Commercial Journal. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1845-1861

Daily Dispatch. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1846-1847

Daily Morning Post. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1842-1843

Daily Morning Post. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1846-1855

Daily Pittsburgh Gazette and Commercial Journal. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1861-1863

Daily Pittsburgh Gazette. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1863-1866

Daily Pittsburgh Gazette. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1833-1841

Daily Pittsburgh Gazette. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1851-1861

Daily Pittsburgher. (Pittsburgh [Pa.) 1839-1840

Daily Post. (Pittsburgh [Pa.) 1864-1884

Daily Spirit of the Age. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1844-1845

Democrat and Workingmen's Advocate. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1836-1838

Druid. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1918-1939

East End Bulletin. (Pittsburg, Pa.) 1876-1888

East End Journal. (Pittsburg, Pa.) 1889-1900

East Ender. (Pittsburg [Pa.]) 1877-1922

Evening Chronicle. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1851-1856

Evening News. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1880-1881

Evening Penny Press. (Pittsburg [Pa.]) 1884-1887

Freeman. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1836-1837

Freiheits Freund Und Pittsburger Courier. (Pittsburg [Pa.]) 1860-1865

Freiheits Freund Und Pittsburger Courier. (Pittsburg, Pa.) 1860-1901

Freiheits Freund. (Pittsburg [Pa.]) 1853-1860

Freiheits-Freund. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1865-1901

Gazette Times. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1906-1925

Harris' Intelligencer, Commercial Reporter and General Advertiser. Volume (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1839-1841

Harris' Intelligencer, General Advertiser, and Pittsburgh Prices Current. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1836-1839

Hesperus, and Western Miscellany. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1828-1829

Hill Top Record and South Hills Economist. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1931-1952

Hill Top Record. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1904-1931

Homewood-Brushton Informer. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1984-Current

Homewood-Brushton News & Shoppers Guide. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1967-1973

Irish Pennsylvanian. (Pittsburg [Pa.) 1890-1921

Iron City Trades Journal. (Pittsburg, Pa.) 1908-1916

Iron City and Pittsburgh Weekly Chronicle. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1841-1842

Iron City, and Pittsburgh Saturday Morning Chronicle. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1842-1845

Iron World and Manufacturer. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1870-1874

Jewish Chronicle. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1962-Current

Jewish Criterion. (Pittsburg, Pa.) 1895-1962

Justice. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1911-1914

Market Square : Msq. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1983-1986

Market Square of Pittsburgh. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1970-1983

Mercury. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1811-1814

Mercury. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1820-1826

Mercury. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1831-1832

Morning Ariel. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1845-1849

Morning Chronicle. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1849-1851

Morning Chronicle. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1841-1844

Mount Washington and Duquesne Heights News. (Pittsburg [Pa.]) 1904-1908

National Labor Journal. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1916-1924

National Labor Tribune [Microform]. (Pittsburgh) 1875-1958

National Labor Tribune. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1874-1958

National Light. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1888-1889

New Pittsburgh Courier [Electronic Resource]. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1966-Current

New Pittsburgh Courier [Microform]. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1966-2003

New Pittsburgh Courier [Microform]. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1966-Current

New Pittsburgh Courier. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1966-2003

New Pittsburgh Courier. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1966-Current

Northside Chronicle. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1985-Current

Oakland News Shopper. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1934-1935

Oakland News. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1935-1985

Oakland. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1988-Current

Oaklander. (Pittsburg, Pa.) 1911-1928

Patriot. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1982-Current

Pennsylvania Advocate and Pittsburgh Daily Advertiser. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1833-1834

Pennsylvania Advocate. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1832-1833

Pitt News. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1932-Current

Pitt Weekly. (Pittsburgh) 1910-1932

Pittsburg Daily Dispatch. (Pittsburg, Pa.) 1847-1880

Pittsburg Daily News. (Pittsburg, Pa.) 1896-1901

Pittsburg Dispatch. (Pittsburg [Pa.]) 1880-1923

Pittsburg Observer. (Pittsburg, Pa.) 1899-1923

Pittsburg Press. (Pittsburg, Pa.) 1887-1992

Pittsburg Saturday Star. (Pittsburg, Pa.) 1883-1902

Pittsburg Times. (Pittsburg, Pa.) 1880-1883

Pittsburg Times. (Pittsburg, Pa.) 1886-1906

Pittsburgh American. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1839-1854

Pittsburgh Catholic. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1844-1855

Pittsburgh Catholic. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1889-Current

Pittsburgh Christian Advocate. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1840-1931

Pittsburgh Christian Herald, and Western Missionary Reporter. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1833-1835

Pittsburgh Christian Herald. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1836-1838

Pittsburgh Chronicle Telegraph. (Pittsburgh [Pa.) 1884-1927

Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1877-1906

Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1877-1901

Pittsburgh Commercial. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1864-1877

Pittsburgh Commercial. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1866-1877

Pittsburgh Courier [Electronic Resource]. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1910-1950

Pittsburgh Courier [Electronic Resource]. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1955-1966

Pittsburgh Courier [Microform]. (Pittsburgh) 1910-1950

Pittsburgh Courier [Microform]. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1955-1966

Pittsburgh Courier. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1910-1950

Pittsburgh Courier. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1955-1966

Pittsburgh Daily Advocate and Advertiser. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1834-1836

Pittsburgh Daily Commercial. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1863-1864

Pittsburgh Daily Gazette and Advertiser. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1844-1847

Pittsburgh Daily Gazette. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1841-1844

Pittsburgh Daily Gazette. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1847-1851

Pittsburgh Daily Post. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1884-1887

Pittsburgh Evening Chronicle. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1856-1883

Pittsburgh Evening Telegraph. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1873-1876

Pittsburgh Forum. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1970-1975

Pittsburgh Gazette Times. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1925-1927

Pittsburgh Gazette, and Manufacturing and Mercantile Advertiser. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1820-1825

Pittsburgh Gazette. (Pittsburgh [Pa.) 1901-1906

Pittsburgh Gazette. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1786-1820

Pittsburgh Gazette. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1825-1851

Pittsburgh Gazette. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1866-1877

Pittsburgh Gazette. ([Pittsburgh, Pa.]) 1825-1833

Pittsburgh Herald. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1872-1889

Pittsburgh Homewood-Brushton News and Shoppers Guide. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1973-1986

Pittsburgh Homewood-Brushton News. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1987-Current

Pittsburgh Intelligencer. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1841-1843

Pittsburgh Mercury and Allegheny Republican. ([Pittsburgh, Pa.]) 1832-1834

Pittsburgh Mercury and Democrat. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1841-1842

Pittsburgh Mercury. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1814-1820

Pittsburgh Mercury. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1826-1831

Pittsburgh Mercury. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1834-1841

Pittsburgh Morning Chronicle. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1844-1849

Pittsburgh Morning Post. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1855-1859

Pittsburgh Morning Post. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1843-1846

Pittsburgh Point. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1966-1970

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Sun-Telegraph. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1960-1977

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. (Pittsburgh) 1927-1960

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. ([Pittsburgh, Pa.]) 1978-Current

Pittsburgh Post. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1859-1864

Pittsburgh Post. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1887-1927

Pittsburgh Post. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1894-1896

Pittsburgh Saturday Evening Visiter and Galaxy of Western Literature and Science. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1838-1839

Pittsburgh Saturday Evening Visiter. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1837-1838

Pittsburgh Saturday Visiter. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1847-1851

Pittsburgh Sun-Telegraph. ([Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1943-1945

Pittsburgh Sun-Telegraph. ([Pittsburgh, Pa.]) 1927-1960

Pittsburgh Sun. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1906-1927

Pittsburgh Sunday Times. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1872-1873

Pittsburgh Sunday Traveller. (Pittsburgh, [Pa.]) 1882-1890

Pittsburgh Telegraph. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1876-1883

Pittsburgh Weekly Telegraph. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1847-1883

Pleasant Hills Patriot. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1981-1982

Presbyterian Banner & Advocate. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1855-1860

Presbyterian Banner. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1860-1898

Progress. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1957-Current

Prohibition Banner. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1881-1884

Protestant Unionist. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1844-1848

Record. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1979-1982

Saturday Dollar Chronicle. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1859-1864

Saturday Evening Visiter. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1834-1836

Saturday Visiter. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1851-1854

South Hills Economist. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1925-1931

South Hills Patriot and the Pleasant Hills Patriot. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1948-1950

South Hills Record. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1952-Current

South Pittsburger. (Pittsburg, Southside [Pa.]) 1891-1903

South Pittsburgh Reporter. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1971-Current

Spirit of Liberty. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1841-1847

Spirit of the Age. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1843-1844

Squirrel Hill News-Times. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1931-1932

Squirrel Hill News. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1932-1979

Statesman. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1818-1836

Steel City Star. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1977-Current

Sun. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1842-1844

Sunday Globe. (Pittsburg [Pa.) 1876-1889

Sunday Observer. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1937-1959

Sunday Sun-Telegraph. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1927-1928

Times. (Pittsburg [Pa.) 1883-1886

Token. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1848-1854

Tree of Liberty. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1800-1810

Trumpet and Universalist Magazine. (Boston) 1842-1862

Union Reporter. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1893-1958

Unione. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1921-Current

Weekly Aurora. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1843-1844

Weekly Chronicle Telegraph. (Pittsburgh [Pa.) 1884-1923

Weekly Mercury and Manufacturer. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1842-1848

Weekly Pittsburgher, and Allegheny Democrat. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1839-1841

Weekly Sun. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1843-1844

Welsh-American. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1914-1918

West Mifflin Area Record. (Pittsburgh, Pa) 1984-Current

Pittsburgh Probate Records

Pittsburgh School Records

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1859 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1860 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1861 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1862 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1863 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1864 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1865 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1866 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1869 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1870 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1871 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1873 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1874 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1875 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1876 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1877 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1878 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1879 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1880 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1881 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1882 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1883 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1884 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1885 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1886 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1887 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1888 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1889 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1890-1905 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1892 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1893 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1894 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1895 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1896 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1897 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1898 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1899 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1900 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1901 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1902 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1903 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1904 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Class of 1905 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA High School Classes of 1867 and 1868 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA Samuel F. B. Morse Elementary School abt 1920 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA South High School Alumni Notes 1914-1918 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA South High School Alumni Notes 1914-1924 Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA South Hills High School 1933 Football Team Photo Old Yearbooks

Pittsburgh, PA South Hills High School Sesame News Jan 17, 1934 Old Yearbooks

Schenley High School Yearbook, 1937 Internet Archive

Pittsburgh Tax Records

Additions or corrections to this page? We welcome your suggestions through our Contact Us page


Television, FDR and the 1940 Presidential Conventions

This year marks a major turning point in Presidential nominating conventions with the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. The quadrennial exercises in party politics have without question evolved over the years. During FDR’s active life in national politics, the conventions were raucous affairs, full of intrigue and electoral horse trading. Presidents and candidates were made and broken at them. It was all part of the process, but visible to few Americans.

In 1940, the conventions remained key to Presidential politics. Though Roosevelt held firm control of party machinery, he was seeking an unprecedented third term with no guarantee of re-nomination. There was also the thorny question of the Vice Presidency. John Nance Garner was being retired. The Republicans faced a wide open field after two disastrous national elections. Anything could happen at a convention. FDR knew it.

The 1940 conventions would also prove precedent setting for another reason—television. Broadcast TV was in its infancy in 1940, and commercially available sets had only been available since the previous year. Yet one national network, NBC, comprised of three stations, had grand broadcasting plans. Philadelphia would host the Republicans, and NBC had a coaxial cable connection there from New York City, enabling almost gavel-to-gavel coverage.

The Republican Convention broadcasts in June were enormously successful for NBC. Though viewers were scarce—only several thousand sets had been sold—the network coverage proved the viability of TV for major events. The convention turned out to be an exciting affair with dark horse candidate Wendell Willkie emerging as the nominee. He appeared live on TV for a five-minute acceptance speech to deafening cheers from the crowd. It was riveting.

Press coverage of the broadcasts was widely laudatory. Though television lights were glaringly bright and hot, forcing some correspondents, including NBC commentators to don sunglasses in the arena, lucky viewers were mesmerized. The broadcasts ran six to eight hours daily whereas radio coverage was fragmentary. After watching Willkie on the convention broadcast, one columnist noted that the Indiana Republican, a dynamic, colorful orator, was made for TV. He judged FDR better suited to radio.

The Democrats hosted their 1940 convention in Chicago. This presented a dilemma for NBC. The network wanted live coverage, but limited television technology made it impossible. So NBC developed another plan. Partnering with American Pathe newsreels, they would fly 1000 feet of film (the length of a standard 16 mm film reel or about ten minutes worth of film) to NYC, and each day broadcast filmed highlights instead–not ideal, but better than nothing.

Recognizing the success of the Republican coverage, and knowing they had an unusual opponent in Wendell Willkie, Democrats agreed to this arrangement. Each day at 3:30 PM and 9:00 PM, the network would broadcast the ten-minute films. With no plans to attend the convention, FDR approved the plan. He would follow the convention by radio and telephone from the White House—not by TV.

Though FDR had embraced radio and played an outsize role in popularizing the medium for political and policy communications, he did not do so for television, though he held the distinction of being the first President to appear on TV at the 1939 New York World’s Fair. We can speculate about his general disinterest in television. Maybe he thought the infant medium was too limited, or maybe he thought Willkie was better on TV, too.

FDR had agreed to the installation of a television at the White House in late 1938. However, that plan had been shelved after the manufacturer publicized the effort in order to sell television sets. He did allow NBC to install one at Springwood, his Hyde Park home, in mid-1939, but he seemed more interested in having the technicians service his radios. A TV did eventually get installed at the White House, but it was more of a curiosity than a source of information or entertainment.

The 1940 Democratic National Convention also proved an exciting affair. FDR had played coy about a third term, though he wanted re-nomination. After a slow start to plans for a convention draft, he dispatched Eleanor Roosevelt to Chicago to speak on his behalf, proving his political prowess once again. All that was left to do was accept the nomination. He did this shortly after midnight on July 19, 1940, speaking before radio microphones and newsreel cameras in his shirtsleeves at the White House.

NBC maintained a meager television schedule during the war years. Other organizations, such as Dumont (an early TV network after the war), also tried to interest the President in televising events, such as his 1941 birthday ball. The telecast would come directly to the White House from a Washington, DC, hotel, enabling the President to see, not simply hear over radio, the festivities. His response was a terse “no.”

FDR’s aides resisted efforts by NBC to broadcast the President’s White House speeches in March 1945. We can speculate that it had as much to do with the President’s appearance and declining health as it did with fairness (see letter below). CBS and Dumont would most likely have found a way to make it work if given the chance. And radio, print, and newsreel pool coverage had worked during the war. FDR would die five weeks later.

But TV lived on, and after the war, television manufacturers and broadcast networks began a stunning technological and commercial advance that would make TV the dominant medium in the United States within a decade. Willkie may have been more suited for television in 1940, but FDR did just fine by radio. After all, he won a third term.


50 Years of Black History: A Time Line

Feb. 1, 1960, four students at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical College in Greensboro, N.C., begin a sit-in at Woolworth's Drug Store.

Oct. 1: James Meredith becomes the first black student to enroll at the University of Mississippi, escorted by U.S. marshals by order of President John F. Kennedy. Oct. 24: James Brown and the Famous Flames record Live at the Apollo, ranked 24th by Rolling Stone magazine in 2003 in its list of the 500 greatest albums.

Sidney Poitier wins best actor for Lilies of the Field . Aug. 28: The March on Washington becomes the largest civil rights demonstration in U.S. history, a moment defined by Dr. King's historic "I Have a Dream" speech. James Baldwin publishes The Fire Next Time.

Sept. 15: Four girls — Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley, ages 11 to 14 — are murdered when the 16th Street Baptist Church is bombed in Birmingham, Ala.

Feb. 21: Malcolm X is assassinated in Harlem by members of the Nation of Islam. Aug. 6: President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the Voting Rights Act SNCC activist John Lewis and 600 marchers, protesting denial of black voting rights, are attacked by Alabama state troopers on the Edmund Pettus Bridge. Aug. 11-21: The Watts Riots leave 34 dead, more than 3,500 arrested birth of the Black Arts Movement, when LeRoi Jones becomes Amiri Baraka.

May: Stokely Carmichael becomes chairman of the SNCC and embraces "black power." The Black Panther Party for Self-Defense is founded by Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale in Oakland, Calif.

Jan. 3, Edward William Brooke III becomes the first black senator (Massachusetts) since Reconstruction. Aug. 31, Thurgood Marshall takes his seat as the first African-American justice of the United States Supreme Court.

April 4, Martin Luther King Jr. is assassinated in Memphis, Tenn.

November: Shirley Chisholm becomes the first black woman elected to the U.S. Congress.

Charles Gordone wins the Pulitzer Prize for drama for his play No Place to Be Somebody.

November, Barbara Jordan of Houston and Andrew Young of Atlanta become the first blacks elected to Congress from the South since 1898.

May 29, Tom Bradley elected mayor of Los Angeles Oct. 16, Maynard Jackson elected mayor of Atlanta.

April 8, Henry Louis "Hank" Aaron hits his 715th home run, breaking Babe Ruth's longstanding record. Nov. 12, in the Bronx, Clive "Hercules" Campbell, aka "Kool Herc," starts using two turntables and chanting rhymes over the beat, forming the basis of rap.

Arthur Ashe becomes the first African-American male to win the British Men's Singles championship at Wimbledon.

Robert Hayden becomes the first African-American U.S. poet laureate.

Feb. 3, The eighth and final episode of the mini-series, Roots, based on Alex Haley’s novel, airs, receiving the highest ratings for a single program.

Jan. 1: Sugar Hill Gang releases "Rappers Delight." Along with Kurtis "Blow" Walker's "Christmas Rapping" and "The Breaks," which went gold, these recordings will be recalled as the formal birth of the hip-hop movement, which would be the dominant popular cultural form in America for the next three decades.

Nov. 30, 1982, Michael Jackson releases Thriller with sales of $110 million, it becomes the best-selling recording of all time.

April 12: Harold Washington elected mayor of Chicago Alice Walker's The Color Purple wins the Pulitzer Prize for fiction and the National Book Award. March 25: Michael Jackson introduces "the Moon Walk" during a rendition of "Billie Jean" at "Motown 25: Yesterday, Today, Forever." June 22: The State Legislature of Louisiana repeals the last racial-classification law in the U.S. Aug: 30: Guion "Guy" Bluford Jr. becomes the first black astronaut to fly on the Challenger. Nov. 2: President Ronald Reagan signs the bill establishing a federal holiday in honor of Martin Luther King Jr.

Carl Lewis wins four gold medals at the L.A. Olympics, matching Jesse Owens' record of 1936.

Jesse Jackson wins one-fourth of the votes cast in the Democratic primaries and caucuses, and one-eighth of the convention delegates in his first presidential bid.

The Oprah Winfrey Show is syndicated in more than 120 American cities.

Jan. 20: First MLK Day celebrated. September: The Oprah Winfrey Show ranked No. 1 talk show and No. 3 in syndication, reaching 10 million viewers daily in 192 cities. Winfrey founds Harpo Productions.

Michael Jackson releases Bad, which sells 30 million copies.

July 20: The Rev. Jesse Jackson receives 1,218 delegate votes at the Democratic National Convention Florence Griffith Joyner wins four track-and-field medals at the Seoul Olympic Games. Nov. 4: Comedian Bill Cosby announces $20 million donation to Spelman College.

March: Frederick Drew Gregory becomes the first African American to command a space shuttle, the Discovery. Aug. 10: General Colin L. Powell named chair of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff. Nov. 7: L. Douglas Wilder elected first black governor of any state (Virginia) David Dinkins elected mayor of New York.

Sharon Pratt Kelley elected mayor of Washington, D.C., the first African-American female to head a major city. August Wilson wins Pulitzer Prize for The Piano Lesson.

Feb. 11, Nelson Mandela is freed after 27 years in prison August Wilson wins Pulitzer Prize for The Piano Lesson .

March 3, Rodney King brutally beaten in San Fernando Valley by L.A. police officers, sparking riots, an investigation and subsequent trial Feb. 1, Harvard University commits resources to create major, endowed research center in African and African-American Studies Oct. 15, Judge Clarence Thomas confirmed by the Senate, by a vote of 52-48, as second black associate justice of the Supreme Court, following bitter testimony of sexual harassment by law professor, Anita Hill.

April 30, The Cosby Show broadcasts final episode of its eight-season run Sept. 12, Dr. Mae Jemison becomes first black female astronaut Nov. 3, Carol Moseley Braun is the first black woman elected to the U.S. Senate (Illinois).

Oct. 7: Toni Morrison becomes the first African American to win the Nobel Prize for literature. Rita Dove becomes the first black female poet laureate of the U.S. Dr. Joycelyn Elders becomes the first female, and first black, surgeon general.

Cornel West moves from Princeton to Harvard, joining the "Dream Team" of African-American scholars.

Oct. 16, Million Man March, under the leadership of Minister Louis Farrakhan, held in Washington, D.C.

Oprah Winfrey ranked third on Forbes list of highest-paid entertainers.

DNA evidence strongly suggests that Thomas Jefferson is likely father of Sally Hemings' children.

Michael Jordan retires during his 13-season career, Jordan wins six NBA championships. November: Encarta Africana released by Microsoft and The Africana Encyclopedia, first conceived by W.E.B. Du Bois, is finally published.

2000-July, Venus Williams becomes the first black woman to win the Women's Singles title at Wimbledon since Althea Gibson in 1957 and 1958 December, President George W. Bush appoints Colin L. Powell as secretary of state, and Condoleezza Rice as national security adviser.

Forbes Magazine lists Oprah Winfrey, with net worth of $900 million, as No. 280 of the 400 richest people in the United States. Ruth Simmons becomes first black president of an Ivy League university.

March 24, Halle Berry becomes the first African-American female to win an Academy Award for Best Actress Denzel Washington becomes second African-American male to win Best Actor.

Oprah Winfrey becomes billionaire. Dec. 13: President George W. Bush signs legislation to create the National Museum of African American History and Culture on the Mall.

Four black men — Kenneth Chenault (American Express), Richard Parsons (Time Warner), Franklin Raines (Fannie Mae) and E. Stanley O'Neal (Merrill Lynch) — have become CEOs of Fortune 500 companies.

Jan. 26, Condoleezza Rice becomes first black female secretary of state Aug. 29, Hurricane Katrina hits Louisiana and southern Mississippi, devastating New Orleans.

2005 tragedy memorialized in 2006 by Spike Lee in HBO documentary When the Levees Broke.

Jan. 31: Coretta Scott King dies at age 78.

Deval Patrick is elected governor of Massachusetts.

Nov. 4, U.S. Sen. Barack Hussein Obama becomes the 44th president of the United States.

Jan. 30: Former Maryland Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele becomes chairman of the National Republican Committee, effectively becoming the head of the Republican Party. June 25: Michael Joseph Jackson, the "King of Pop," dies of a drug overdose.

Nov. 10: President Obama delivers his acceptance speech in Stockholm on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Feb. 2: The U.S. Senate confirms, with a vote of 75 to 21, Eric H. Holder Jr. as attorney general of the United States. Holder is the first African American to serve as attorney general.

Feb. 27: A new visitor center opens in New York City, near the rediscovered 17th- and 18th-century burial grounds of Africans, free and enslaved, who helped create the nation's cultural and commercial capital.

Nov. 24: Democrat Kamala Harris wins election as California's attorney general. In doing so, she becomes the first woman, first African American and first Indian American in California history to be elected state attorney general.


Guide to the Brooklyn Yearbook Collection, BCMS.0031

Click here for a printable PDF version of this finding aid.

Scope and Contents

The Brooklyn Yearbook Collection spans over 100 years of Brooklyn educational history. In addition to the class listings and photographs that are useful in genealogical research, the yearbooks provide a wealth of information about academics, clubs, athletic groups, and student activities in Brooklyn in the 19th and 20th centuries. Many of the publications included in this collection are compendiums of student artwork and writing, with visually striking design and content. The collection is consistently growing due to active acquisitions and donations.

Arrangement

The yearbooks are arranged alphabetically by school name. Each school's yearbooks are arranged chronologically on the shelf. The yearbooks' titles are noted, but do not affect the physical arrangement.

Administrative Information

Publication Information

Brooklyn Public Library - Brooklyn Collection , 2018

Access

Collection is located in the Brooklyn Collection at the Central Branch at Grand Army Plaza. The collection may only be used in the library and is not available through interlibrary loan. Requests to view the collection must be made at least 48 hours in advance of visit.

While many items in the Brooklyn Collection are unrestricted, we do not own reproduction rights to all materials. Be aware of the several kinds of rights that might apply: copyright, licensing and trademarks. The researcher assumes all responsibility for copyright questions.

Provenance

This is a composite collection from many different sources that include both purchases and donations.

Related Materials

Ephemera Collection: Most of the schools listed here are also represented in our ephemera files, which contain graduation ceremony programs, report cards, invitations, and other materials.

High School Newspaper Collection, 1853-1975: A collection of publications from Brooklyn schools, covering life in the schools as well as events in their communities. Note: This collection is currently being reprocessed. Please contact us for access.

Class Photographs Collection: A small collection of group photographs from Brooklyn schools, spanning the years 1904-2002.

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)

Genre(s)

Subject(s)

  • Church schools
  • Private schools -- New York (State) -- New York.
  • Public schools -- New York (State) -- New York.

Collection Inventory

Abraham Lincoln High School

June 1935, June 1936, January 1937, January 1938, June 1944,June 1949, 1989


16 January 1940 - History

Here's a list of the worst snowstorms, by amount of white stuff dumped. Every one includes at least two days. Highest one-day total included, if available. Data comes from several National Weather Service sources.

1. 31 inches, Jan. 6-8, 1996 (27.6 inches fell on Jan. 7).

2. 28.5 inches, Feb. 5-6, 2010 (21.9 inches fell on Feb. 6). Area high: 30.0 inches in Ridley Park, Delaware County.

3. 23.2 inches, Dec. 19-20, 2009 (22.5 inches on Dec. 19). Area high: 25 inches in Swedesboro, Gloucester County.

4. 22.4 inches, Jan. 23-24, 2016

5. 21.3 inches, Feb. 11-12, 1983 (21.1 inches on Feb. 11).

6. 21 inches, Dec. 25-26, 1909 (15.5 inches on Dec. 26, 1909).

7. 19.4 inches, April 3-4, 1915 (19.0 inches on April 3).

8. 18.9 inches, Feb. 12-14, 1899.

9. 18.7 inches, Feb. 16-17, 2003 (16.0 on Feb. 16). Area high: 24.5 inches in city's Byberry section.


Developments from autumn 1941 to spring 1942

In the year following the collapse of France in June 1940, British strategists, relying as they could on supplies from the nonbelligerent United States, were concerned first with home defense, second with the security of the British positions in the Middle East, and third with the development of a war of attrition against the Axis powers, pending the buildup of adequate forces for an invasion of the European continent. For the United States, President Roosevelt’s advisers, from November 1940, based their strategic plans on the “Europe first” principle that is to say, if the United States became engaged in war simultaneously against Germany, Italy, and Japan, merely defensive operations should be conducted in the Pacific (to protect at least the Alaska–Hawaii–Panama triangle) while an offensive was being mounted in Europe.

Japan’s entry into the war terminated the nonbelligerency of the United States. The three weeks’ conference, named Arcadia, that Roosevelt, Churchill, and their advisers opened in Washington, D.C., on December 22, 1941, reassured the British about U.S. maintenance of the “Europe first” principle and also produced two plans: a tentative one, code-named “ Sledgehammer,” for the buildup of an offensive force in Great Britain, in case it should be decided to invade France and another, code-named “ Super-Gymnast,” for combining a British landing behind the German forces in Libya (already planned under the code name “Gymnast”) with a U.S. landing near Casablanca on the Atlantic coast of Morocco. The same conference furthermore created the machinery of the Combined Chiefs of Staff, where the British Chiefs of Staff Committee was to be linked continuously, through delegates in Washington, D.C., with the newly established U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff Organization, so that all aspects of the war could be studied in concert. It was on January 1, 1942, during the Arcadia Conference, that the Declaration of the United Nations was signed in Washington, D.C., as a collective statement of the Allies’ war aims in sequel to the Atlantic Charter.

Meanwhile, Churchill became anxious to do something to help the embattled Soviets—who were clamouring for the United States and Britain to invade continental Europe so as to take some of the German pressure off the Eastern Front. Roosevelt was no less conscious than Churchill of the fact that the Soviet Union was bearing by far the greatest burden of the war against Germany and this consideration inclined him to listen to the arguments of his Joint Chiefs of Staff Organization for a change of plan. After some hesitation, he sent his confidant Harry Hopkins and his army chief of staff General George C. Marshall to London in April 1942 to suggest the scrapping of “Super-Gymnast” in favour of “ Bolero,” namely the concentration of forces in Great Britain for a landing in Europe (perhaps at Brest or at Cherbourg) in the autumn then “ Roundup,” an invasion of France by 30 U.S. and 18 British divisions, could follow in April 1943. The British agreed but soon began to doubt the practicability of mounting an amphibious invasion of France at such an early date.

Attempts to conclude an Anglo-Soviet political agreement were renewed without result, but a 20-year Anglo-Soviet alliance was signed on May 26, 1942 and, though Churchill warned the Soviet foreign minister, Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich Molotov, not to expect an early second front in Europe, Molotov seemed gratified by what he was told about Anglo-U.S. plans.

Visiting Roosevelt again in the latter part of June 1942, Churchill at Hyde Park, New York, and in Washington, D.C., pressed for a revised and enlarged joint operation in North Africa before the end of the year, instead of a buildup for the invasion of France but the U.S. Joint Chiefs resolutely upheld the latter plan. After further debate and disagreement, in July the U.S. Joint Chiefs yielded at last to British obstinacy in favour of a North African enterprise: it was decided that “ Torch,” as this combined Anglo-U.S. operation came to be called, should begin the following autumn.

Already, on July 17, 1942, Churchill had had to notify Stalin that convoys of Allied supplies to northern Russia must be suspended because of German submarine activity on the Arctic sea route (on June 2 a convoy from Iceland had lost 23 out of 34 vessels). Consequently, it was the more awkward to inform Stalin that there would be no second front in Europe before 1943. In mid-August 1942, when Churchill went to Moscow to break the news, Stalin raged against the retreat from the plan for a second front in Europe but had to admit the military logic of “Torch.”


Migratory Bird Treaty Act

The Migratory Bird Treaty Act is a Federal law that carries out the United States’ commitment to four international conventions with Canada, Japan, Mexico and Russia. Those conventions protect birds that migrate across international borders.

The take of all migratory birds, including bald eagles, is governed by the Migratory Birds Treaty Act’s regulations. The Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) prohibits the taking, killing, possession, transportation, and importation of migratory birds, their eggs, parts, and nests except as authorized under a valid permit (50 CFR 21.11). Additionally, the MBTA authorizes and directs the Secretary of the Interior to determine if, and by what means, the take of migratory birds should be allowed and to adopt suitable regulations permitting and governing take (for example, hunting seasons for ducks and geese).

Penalties under the MBTA include a maximum of two years imprisonment and $250,000 fine for a felony conviction and six months imprisonment or $5,000 fine for a misdemeanor conviction. Fines double if the violator is an organization rather than an individual.

The MBTA and its implementing regulations provide authority for the conservation of bald eagles and protect against take if the Endangered Species Act protections are removed.

Penalties associated with violating the Migratory Bird Treaty Act

Under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, take alone is a misdemeanor violation with maximum penalty of six months in prison and $15,000 fine, and commercialization is a felony violation with a maximum penalty of two years imprisonment and $250,000 fine ($500,000 for an organization).


Watch the video: World War II News and Old Time Radio January 16, 1940 (June 2022).


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