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Stephen Tomlin : Biography

Stephen Tomlin : Biography


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Stephen Tomlin, the son of Thomas Tomlin, was born in 1901.His father was a judge who in 1929 was appointed as a Law Lord and was created a life peer with the title Baron Tomlin of Ash.

Tomlin was an artist and he became involved with the Bloomsbury Group,. This group of left-wing intellectuals included, Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell, Clive Bell, John Maynard Keynes, Lytton Strachey, E. M. Forster, Duncan Grant, Gerald Brenan, Ralph Partridge, Bertram Russell, Ottoline Morrell, Leonard Woolf, David Garnett, Roger Fry, Desmond MacCarthy and Arthur Waley.

Frances Marshall described Tomlin: "The two sides of his personality were fused together as it were by an excellent brain inherited from his father the judge (Lord Tomlin), shown in his enjoyment of arguments with a distinctly legal flavour.... Tommy (Tomlin) was on the short side, squarely built, with a large head set on a short neck. He had the striking profile of a Roman emperor on a coin, fair straight hair brushed back from a fine forehead, a pale face and grey eyes."

Tomlin became a regular visitor to Ham Spray House, the home of Lytton Strachey, Dora Carrington and Ralph Partridge. According to Strachey's biographer, Stanford Patrick Rosenbaum, they created: "A polygonal ménage that survived the various affairs of both without destroying the deep love that lasted the rest of their lives. Strachey's relation to Carrington was partly paternal; he gave her a literary education while she painted and managed the household. Ralph Partridge... became indispensable to both Strachey, who fell in love with him, and Carrington." However, Frances Marshall denied that the two men were lovers and that Lytton quickly realised that Ralph was "completely heterosexual".

Michael Holroyd, the author of Lytton Strachey (1994), has argued: "Tomlin, being bisexual, for a brief spell occupied a virtuoso position in the Ham Spray régime... The mercurial Stephen Tomlin who, greatly attracting Lytton and repelling Ralph, spiralled round the Ham Spray molecule causing shock waves everywhere." " Tomlin began an affair with Henrietta Bingham, Carrington's lover. In July 1924 he took Bingham to Scotland. Carrington wrote to Gerald Brenan complaining that "Henrietta repays my affections almost as negatively as you find I do yours."

Tomlin began an affair with Carrington in 1926. Carrington's husband Ralph Partridge, strongly objected to the relationship, "fearing he (Tomlin) was someone more likely to destroy than to create happiness." Frances Marshall agreed: "One side of his character was creatively gifted, charming and sensitive; the other was dominated by a destructive impulse (fuelled probably by deep neurotic despair) whose effect was that he couldn't see two people happy together without being impelled to intervene and take one away, leaving the other bereft. Or it would take the form of a direct bid for power over others - whether male or female, for he was bi-sexual - which he was well-equipped to exert. The sequel would be a fit of suicidal depression and guilt-feelings."

Tomlin was also having an affair with Carrington's friend, Julia Strachey. His affair with Carrington came to an end when Tomlin married Julia in July 1927. The married couple rented a stone cottage at Swallowcliffe in Wiltshire. Carrington was a regular visitor: "Really its equal to Ham Spray in elegance and comfort, only cleaner and tidier."

In July 1931 Tomlin began working on a bust of Virginia Woolf. Her biographer, Hermione Lee, argued that being sculpted by Tomlin "made her think of herself as an image, a thing: she hated it, even more than sitting for her portrait." Quentin Bell added: "For somehow Virginia managed to forget, in agreeing to the proposal, that the sculptor must inevitably wish to look at his sitter and Virginia should have recollected that one of the things she most disliked in life was being peered at. A very few friends had been allowed to make pictures; some were made by stealth." Despite this, Bell believes that it was a successful work of art: "It is not flattering. It makes Virginia look older and fiercer than she was, but it has a force, a life, a truth, which his other works (those I have seen) do not possess."

Tomlin also produced a bust of Lytton Strachey. Later that year he became extremely ill. He had a fever that would not go away and constantly felt tired. At first he was diagnosed as having typhoid. He then saw another specialist who suggested it was ulcerative colitis. Frances Marshall pointed out: "In those days bulletins were published in the daily papers mentioning the progress of well-known people's illnesses. Lytton rated this degree of importance and the press often rang up, though the nice lady at the local exchange dealt with their queries and kept them supplied with news... On Christmas Day 1931 he was given up for dead. In the evening he made an astonishing recovery from near-unconsciousness."

On 19th January 1932, Dora Carrington asked the nurse who was caring for him if there was any chance that he might survive the illness. She replied: "Oh no - I don't think so now". Soon afterwards she went into the garage and tried to kill herself. However, during the night Ralph Partridge went looking for her and "found her in the garage with the car engine running, rushed in and dragged her out".

Lytton Strachey died of undiagnosed stomach cancer on 21st January 1932. His death made Carrington suicidal. She wrote a passage from David Hume in her diary: "A man who retires from life does no harm to society. He only ceases to do good. I am not obliged to do a small good to society at the expense of a great harm to myself. Why then should I prolong a miserable existence... I believe that no man ever threw away life, while it was worth keeping."

According to Michael Holroyd, the author of Lytton Strachey (1994): "Of all the friends he (Ralph Patridge) invited to Ham Spray it was Stephen Tomlin who appeared most successful in halting her from making another attempt at suicide." Dora Carrington wrote in her journal: "He (Tomlin) persuaded me that after a serious operation or fever, a man's mind would not be in a good state to decide on such an important step. I agreed - so I will defer my decision for a month or two until the result of the operation is less acute." After he returned home, Carrington wrote to him: "You made this last week bearable which nobody else could have done. Those endless conversations were not quite pointless."

Frances Marshall was with Ralph Partridge when he received a phone-call on 11th March 1932. "The telephone rang, waking us. It was Tom Francis, the gardener who came daily from Ham; he was suffering terribly from shock, but had the presence of mind to tell us exactly what had happened: Carrington had shot herself but was still alive. Ralph rang up the Hungerford doctor asking him to go out to Ham Spray immediately; then, stopping only to collect a trained nurse, and taking Bunny with us for support, we drove at breakneck speed down the Great West Road.... We found her propped on rugs on her bedroom floor; the doctor had not dared to move her, but she had touched him greatly by asking him to fortify himself with a glass of sherry. Very characteristically, she first told Ralph she longed to die, and then (seeing his agony of mind) that she would do her best to get well. She died that same afternoon."

Stephen Tomlin, who separated from Julia Strachey in 1934, died on 10th January 1937.

Returning we saw Lytton and Carrington on the lawn. Tea was ready. ... Now it was over and Tommy (Stephen Tomlin) was standing with his back to the fireplace talking to Julia and me. He couldn't fail to be aware that Lytton was putting on his outdoor shoes, in obvious hope of a walk with him. This he does in a way all his own. He puts each shoe down with great care just in front of the foot to which it belongs, and then slips it gently in, obviously enjoying the process. Tommy was manifesting his inveterate passion for being in demand by more than one person at once, and I remembered that Ralph told me how Lytton had confessed to having put a love letter under what he believed to be Tommy's door. But not till Julia had left the room did Lytton say in a peculiarly mild voice, "Do you feel like a little walk?" They set off, and as Ralph and Carrington were driving Alix home, Julia and I were left alone together, discussing whether she would look for a job or not. She was nowhere nearer a decision.

"Swallowcliffe is definitely impossible unless Tommy and I are married - but I shouldn't be surprised if we do get married." "No. Nor should I," I said somewhat untruthfully. I don't believe she is really in love with Tommy, but it might rescue her from what she fears may be an unhappy future, and so make her happier. If only Tommy weren't so neurotic and alarmingly destructive, but of course he's extremely intelligent, and this weekend he has been sane and charming.

Stephen Tomlin, a charmer whose charm totally failed to work upon Virginia, had nevertheless persuaded her to sit to him for a sculptured head. Posterity may be glad that he did so. No-one else had any cause to be glad. For somehow Virginia managed to forget, in agreeing to the proposal, that the sculptor must inevitably wish to look at his sitter and Virginia should have recollected that one of the things she most disliked in life was being peered at. A very few friends had been allowed to make pictures; some were made by stealth. She didn't like being photographed, but if a painter or a photographer is unwelcome, how much more so a modeller? The man with the camera may be offensive but his offence is swiftly committed. The painter is worse in this respect, but he may, like Lily Briscoe, be supposed to regard you as no more than a part of the composition - an interesting but perhaps not an essential accent. But a sculptor has but one object: yourself - you from in front, you from behind, you from every conceivable angle - and his is a staring, measuring, twisting and turning business, an exhaustive and a remorseless enquiry. Virginia couldn't stand it. His face staring into hers appeared ugly, obscene and impertinent. It seemed an insult to her personality, pinning her down, wasting her precious time - insufferable.

In vain Vanessa tried to ease matters by coming with her and making a sketch of her own. Ethel came too. Nothing answered. Tomlin was intolerable. He insisted on making plans to suit his own convenience. Then he was not punctual and she, Virginia, had to plod along dusty streets - a proceeding which if the object had been different she would have found delightful - to reach his studio, and in short she was, as Vanessa said, in "a state of rage and despair," so that after four short sittings-how short time seems to those who paint and how long to those who sit-she struck. Two further sessions were by some prodigy of persuasion vouchsafed, and then she would have no more of it. She was free of the affliction. Poor Tomlin was miserable. The work had to be left unfinished without any hope that it would ever be brought to a satisfactory conclusion.

Now the final irony is this: Stephen Tomlin's best claim to immortality rests upon that bust. It is not flattering. It makes Virginia look older and fiercer than she was, but it has a force, a life, a truth, which his other works (those I have seen) do not possess. Virginia gave him no time to spoil his first brilliant conception. Irritated, despondent, reckless, he pushed his clay into position and was forced to give, while there was still time, the essential structure of her face. Her blank eyes stare as though in blind affronted dismay, but it is far more like than any of the photographs. So far as Virginia herself was concerned, by August 1931 the business was over.

If such a condition exists, as I believe it does, Stephen Tomlin (Tommy) was a case of dual personality. One side of his character was creatively gifted, charming and sensitive; the other was dominated by a destructive impulse (fuelled probably by deep neurotic despair) whose effect was that he couldn't see two people happy together without being impelled to intervene and take one away, leaving the other bereft. The sequel would be a fit of suicidal depression and guilt-feelings. The two sides of his personality were fused together as it were by an excellent brain inherited from his father the judge (Lord Tomlin), shown in his enjoyment of arguments with a distinctly legal flavour. He broke several hearts, but certainly gave more happiness than the reverse and had many loyal friends; if one could forget his darker side he was an interesting and even enchanting companion. Personally I did forget it most of the time, although on the rare occasions he switched on his charm for my benefit I found it unconvincing; but to Ralph the destructive element was anathema, and when Tommy revealed it he reacted with irritation - even dislike.

Tommy was on the short side, squarely built, with a large head set on a short neck. He had the striking profile of a Roman emperor on a coin, fair straight hair brushed back from a fine forehead, a pale face and grey eyes.

It had been decided, in the event of a crisis occurring, to send for another of Carrington's lovers, Stephen Tomlin. This was Ralph's idea; he wanted to mobilize anyone who might help to ensure her safety. They had got in touch with him and he was standing by. While Tommy was in the house, it was felt, Carrington would not attempt to take her own life. It was a cruel but clever expedient, for its success depended upon Tommy being so unbalanced and neurotic, so prone himself to suicide, shattered by his brother Garrow having been killed flying only the previous month, by the failure of his marriage to Julia Strachey and by all the supports in his life tottering, that Carrington's sense of responsibility would be aroused, and she would pull herself together to attend to him. Tommy's principal relations with other people contained a strong element of dependence. Lytton was not merely one of his closest friends; he relied, in some almost filial way, upon his existence. In the event of Lytton's death, Carrington would have to control herself and Tommy.


Chris Tomlin

Christopher Dwayne Tomlin (born May 4, 1972) [1] is an American contemporary Christian music singer, songwriter, and worship leader from Grand Saline, Texas, United States who has sold over 7 million records. [2] He is a member of Passion Conferences and is signed to EMI's sixstepsrecords. Some of his most well-known songs are "How Great Is Our God", "Our God", "Whom Shall I Fear (God of Angel Armies)" and his cover of "Good Good Father".

Tomlin has been awarded 23 GMA Dove Awards, a Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Christian Music Album for his 2012 album And If Our God Is For Us, and two RIAA certified platinum albums. Because of his songs' popularity in many contemporary churches, TIME magazine stated he may be the "most often sung artist anywhere". [3] Tomlin's 2013 album Burning Lights debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 chart, becoming the fourth CCM album in history to do so. [4]


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&aposNashville&apos and Other Big-Screen Hits

Tomlin made her film debut in Robert Altman&aposs Nashville (1975). Her performance as a gospel singer and mother of two deaf children earned her an Academy Award nomination for best supporting actress. 

Subsequent films included The Late Show (1977) with Art Carney Moment By Moment (1978) with John Travolta and written by Wagner Nine to Five (1980) with Dolly Parton and Jane Fonda The Incredible Shrinking Woman (1981) with Charles Grodin and written by Wagner All of Me (1984) with Steve Martin, Big Business (1988) with Bette Midler Shadows and Fog directed by Woody Allen (1993) Short Cuts (1993) directed by Altman Flirting with Disaster with Ben Stiller (1996) and Tea With Mussolini with Judi Dench and Cher and directed by Franco Zeffirelli (1999).

Following a break from the big screen, Tomlin resurfaced with I Heart Huckabees (2004) with Dustin Hoffmanਊnd directed by David O. Russell, and A Prairie Home Companion (2006) which reunited Tomlin with Altman for his last film. She also starred in Pink Panther II (2009) with Martin, Admission (2013) with Tina Fey and Paul Ruddਊnd Grandma (2015) directed by Paul Weitz.


Steve Biko

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Steve Biko, in full Bantu Stephen Biko, (born December 18, 1946, King William’s Town, South Africa—died September 12, 1977, Pretoria), founder of the Black Consciousness Movement in South Africa. His death from injuries suffered while in police custody made him an international martyr for South African Black nationalism.

After being expelled from high school for political activism, Biko enrolled in and graduated (1966) from St. Francis College, a liberal boarding school in Natal, and then entered the University of Natal Medical School. There he became involved in the multiracial National Union of South African Students (NUSAS), a moderate organization that had long espoused the rights of Blacks. He soon grew disenchanted with NUSAS, believing that, instead of simply allowing Blacks to participate in white South African society, the society itself needed to be restructured around the culture of the Black majority. In 1968 he cofounded the all-Black South African Students’ Organization (SASO), and he became its first president the following year. SASO was based on the philosophy of Black consciousness, which encouraged Blacks to recognize their inherent dignity and self-worth. In the 1970s the Black Consciousness Movement spread from university campuses into urban Black communities throughout South Africa. In 1972 Biko was one of the founders of the Black People’s Convention, an umbrella organization of Black consciousness groups.

Biko drew official censure in 1973, when he and other SASO members were banned their associations, movements, and public statements were thereby restricted. He then operated covertly, establishing the Zimele Trust Fund in 1975 to help political prisoners and their families. He was arrested four times over the next two years and was held without trial for months at a time. On August 18, 1977, he and a fellow activist were seized at a roadblock and jailed in Port Elizabeth. Biko was found naked and shackled outside a hospital in Pretoria, 740 miles (1,190 km) away, on September 11 and died the next day of a massive brain hemorrhage.

Police initially denied any maltreatment of Biko it was determined later that he had probably been severely beaten while in custody, but the officers involved were cleared of wrongdoing. In 1997 five former police officers confessed to having killed Biko and applied for amnesty to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (a body convened to review atrocities committed during the apartheid years) amnesty was denied in 1999. Donald Woods, a South African journalist, depicts his friendship with Biko in Biko (1977 3rd rev. ed., 1991), and their relationship is portrayed in the film Cry Freedom (1987).


Association with Trump

Under Bannon, Breitbart championed the insurgent candidacy of Donald Trump for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination. In August 2016 Bannon became the executive director of Trump’s then-faltering campaign and was credited with bringing discipline and a stronger focus on messaging to it. After Trump surprised the political pundits and pollsters by defeating his Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton, he named Bannon senior counselor and chief White House strategist. Bannon’s appointment was cheered by Trump’s extreme-right supporters but condemned by many on the left and by some establishment Republicans, who expressed fears of the influence of the far-right fringe entering the White House. In the second week of the Trump presidency, Bannon was elevated to regular membership on the “principals committee” of the National Security Council, an appointment that brought criticism from many corners not only because of his inclusion as a political strategist in security meetings but also because the head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the director of national intelligence were no longer included as regular members of the committee. Early in April Bannon was removed from the principals committee in a reorganization that also reinstated the head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the director of national intelligence as permanent members.

For the first half-year of the Trump presidency, Bannon’s presence was among the most influential in the administration. He was widely seen as the driving force behind Trump’s controversial decisions to remove the United States from the Paris Agreement on climate change and to impose a “travel ban” on immigration from several Muslim-majority countries. Bannon’s relentless focus on economic nationalism, however, brought him into rivalry and conflict with other key advisers to the president as well as cabinet members, most notably senior adviser Jared Kushner (Trump’s son-in-law) and national security adviser H.R. McMaster. Criticism of Bannon from outside the administration grew louder after Trump responded slowly to and then blamed “both sides” for the death of a counterprotester at a demonstration by white nationalists, white supremacists, and neo-Nazis on August 12, 2017, in Charlottesville, Virginia. Many observers saw Bannon’s presence in the White House as contributing to the legitimization of far-right fringe groups like those that had rallied in Charlottesville.

Even before the events in Charlottesville unfolded, there had been rumours of Bannon’s imminent departure from the administration. On August 16 The American Prospect published Bannon’s remarks made in a phone conversation with the liberal publication’s coeditor in which Bannon belittled other Trump advisers, dismissed white supremacist groups as “clowns,” and undermined the president’s recent bellicose warnings to North Korea in response to that country’s aggressive pursuit of nuclear weapons. On August 18, 2017, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders announced that “White House Chief of Staff John Kelly and Steve Bannon have mutually agreed today would be Steve’s last day,” though it was widely thought that Bannon had been forced to resign.

Almost immediately, Bannon returned to the helm at Breitbart, determined to use his position outside of government to continue advancing the agenda of Trump, with whom he still talked. Bannon also made known his intention to oust establishment congressional Republicans (including Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell) by backing the candidacies of antiestablishment challengers in Republican primary contests. He jump-started this project by actively championing the candidacy of controversial former Alabama Supreme Court chief justice Roy Moore in the Republican primary election to choose a successor for the U.S. Senate seat representing Alabama that had been vacated by Jeff Sessions when he became U.S. attorney general.

Despite Trump’s surprising support for the Republican establishment’s candidate, onetime Alabama attorney general Luther Strange, Moore won the primary. During the general election campaign in December 2017, however, allegations surfaced that when Moore was in his 30s, he had not only romantically pursued a number of teenage girls but had also engaged in improper behaviour with some of them, including alleged sexual assault. Bannon prominently stood behind Moore, as did Trump, and both suffered significant political setbacks when Alabama voters rejected Moore and sent a Democrat ( Doug Jones) to the Senate for the first time in more than two decades.

Far more damaging to Bannon’s political fortunes were comments that he reportedly had made about Trump’s adult children that were quoted in Michael Wolff’s book Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House, in which White House insiders describe Trump as woefully ill-suited to serve as president. Most notably, Bannon reportedly characterized the meeting of Donald Trump, Jr., with Russians during the 2016 presidential campaign as “treasonous” and “unpatriotic.” In early January 2018 the outraged president lashed out at Bannon (whom he began calling “Sloppy Steve”), saying that Bannon had nothing to do with his presidency and that when Bannon “was fired, he not only lost his job, he lost his mind.” Bannon soon apologized for his remarks and called Trump a “great man,” but his political capital began disappearing quickly. The writing was on the wall for Bannon when Rebekah Mercer—daughter of hedge fund billionaire Robert Mercer, the longtime financial patron of Bannon’s political projects and part owner of Breitbart—distanced herself from Bannon’s “recent actions and statements.” By January 9 Bannon had been compelled to relinquish his position at Breitbart, and he lost his Sirius XM radio show.

Bannon subsequently became involved with We Build the Wall, a nonprofit organization that solicited donations to construct a wall along the southern border of the United States. By August 2020 it had raised more than $25 million. However, that month he and three other men were arrested, accused of defrauding donors. In 2021, shortly before leaving office, Trump pardoned Bannon.

The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica This article was most recently revised and updated by Amy Tikkanen, Corrections Manager.


Stephen Austin

Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article.

Stephen Austin, in full Stephen Fuller Austin, (born November 3, 1793, Austinville, Virginia, U.S.—died December 27, 1836, Columbia, Republic of Texas [now West Columbia, Texas]), founder in the 1820s of the principal settlements of English-speaking people in Texas when that territory was still part of Mexico.

Raised on the Missouri frontier, Austin was educated at Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky, and served in the Missouri territorial legislature (1814–19). The economic panic of 1819 led his father, Moses Austin (1767–1821), to leave his lead-mining business in Missouri and embark upon a scheme of colonization in Texas. Moses obtained a grant of land from the Mexican government but died soon thereafter, and in 1821 Stephen went to Texas to carry out his father’s project. He founded a colony (1822) of several hundred families on the Brazos River, and for some years thereafter, as the migration of U.S. citizens to Texas increased, he was a major figure in the struggle between Mexico and the United States for possession of the territory.

A skillful diplomat, Austin served the interests of Anglo-American slaveholders by defeating an effort to ban slavery in Texas. He tried to induce the Mexican government to make Texas a separate state in the confederation so that the American settlers might have the liberty and self-government that they considered indispensable to further their interests independently of the wishes of the country’s Hispanic and Roman Catholic rulers. When this attempt failed, he recommended in 1833 the organization of a state without waiting for the consent of the Mexican Congress, and he was thrown in prison. He was released in 1835, and, when the Texas revolution broke out in October of that year, he went to the United States to secure help. Returning in June 1836, he was defeated by Sam Houston for the presidency of the new Republic of Texas and served briefly as secretary of state until his death.

This article was most recently revised and updated by Amy Tikkanen, Corrections Manager.


Stephen Tomlin

Currently, Stephen Tomlin holds the position of Chief Operating Officer for USO Metropolitan Washington.

Uso Of Metropolitan Washington-baltimore, Inc.

President & Chief Executive Officer at Uso Of Metropolitan Washington-baltimore, Inc.

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Joint Company Secretary at Lepidico Ltd.

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Chief Administrative, Legal Officer & Executive Vice President at Midwest Cable, Inc.

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Founder at DC Capital Partners LLC

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Chief Executive Officer, Raytheon International Inc at Raytheon Company

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Battle of Antietam

Lee soon mounted an invasion of the North during the Maryland Campaign, and in September 1862 McClellan’s forces engaged the Confederates at the Battle of Antietam. After McClellan’s forces succeeded in breaching the Confederate lines, he once again stalled, keeping over a third of his army in reserve and allowing Lee to retreat into Virginia.

The Battle of Antietam was the single bloodiest day of combat in the Civil War, and while it was presented as a Union victory in the Northern press, it was in effect a tactical draw. Frustrated that McClellan had again failed to destroy Lee’s army, Lincoln officially removed him from command in November 1862.


Watch the video: Γιατί δεν σκοτώσαμε τον Μακάριο ΚΩΝ. ΚΟΜΠΟΚΗΣ (June 2022).


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